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Home Sweet Home at Tivoli Caffe

Home Sweet Home at Tivoli Caffe


The very first time I entered family-owned and operated Tivoli Caffe, I received a warm welcome from the proud owner, George, who smiled and introduced me to his sweet wife, Nancy, and both their sons as if I were an old friend. As I waited in line, I couldn’t help but observe that most of their customers were loyal locals on a casual first name basis with the family.

This warm and sunny café provides just what college kids away from home long for: their family’s kitchen served with a side of loving support.

One look at their menu revealed that they take tremendous care in trying to offer homemade breakfasts, pizza and pasta dishes, salads, sandwiches and deserts–all of which are suitable to satiate a wide variety of dietary needs including gluten free, vegetarian, vegan and carnivores alike.

Photo by Mira Nguyen

I was with my friend, Salam, who had never tried deep-dish pizza before. I enjoyed watching her relishing it and hearing her say, “This is too good!” over and over again.

My simple vanilla steamer was not only delicious but also tailor-made with such care and attentiveness by Nancy herself; she offered me a wide variety of milk and soy products, and she even brought out three different bottles of vanilla syrup for me to choose from.

In short, I was spoiled by their sincere service and will definitely make this cafe my new home away from home.

Note: Tivoli Caffe now offers free delivery or pickup (available online) to all UC buildings and dorms, in addition to regular dining in the cafe.

Photo by Mira Nguyen

Address: 2554 Bancroft Way, Berkeley, CA. 94704
Hours: Mon-Thurs: 7:30 am – 12:00 am, Sat: 9:00 am – 2:00 am, Sun: 9:00 am – 10 pm

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View the original post, Home Sweet Home at Tivoli Caffe, on Spoon University.

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A Delicious Recipe Collection With a Side of History

The Sweet Home Café Cookbook is a fascinating look at African American cooking.

The Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington D.C. isn&apost just home to thousands of historical artifacts, documents, photography, and other media. The museum&aposs restaurant, Sweet Home Café, shows the many ways African Americans have shaped the way our country eats through dishes ranging from Fried Green Tomatoes to Senegalese Peanut Soup, to Hickory-Smoked Pork. Since the museum opened in 2016, the restaurant has become such a popular destination that it now has just released its own cookbook with more than 100 recipes from chefs Albert Lukas and Jerome Grant.

Although the colorful, inviting photographs in Sweet Home Café Cookbook: A Celebration of African American Cooking will inspire you to get in the kitchen, the passages by culinary historian Jessica B. Harris will make you want to sit down and read. Through recipe descriptions and columns on signature ingredients (such as rice, peanuts, and oysters), Harris defines what African American food is. And it isn&apost just Southern food. It&aposs Northern and Western food, too. It&aposs city food and it&aposs country food. And above all, it is global food, with roots that stretch all around the world, including Europe, South America, the Caribbean, and of course, Africa.

WATCH: Meet Dr. Jessica B. Harris

Harris also pays tribute to the creativity and resourcefulness of black cooks, who created some of our country&aposs most beloved and iconic dishes in spite of scarce resources and unimaginable challenges. She writes of enslaved cooks who "perfected special sauces and stayed up nights basting and turning meats they would never taste themselves," and fried chicken that was packed in shoeboxes and carried north and west during the Great Migration. She writes of the significant yet overlooked number of African American cowboys in the Western states. Many were camp cooks, making dishes like Son-of-a-Gun Stew others were more entreprenurial, like Barney Ford, a "failed gold rush prospector turned barber turned restauranteur", who opened a hotel in Denver with a seven-page menu in English and French.

More than just a collection of recipes, Sweet Home Café Cookbook is a fascinating, thoughtful look at African American foodways, and how American food wouldn&apost be nearly as delicious and complex without the many contributions of African American cooks.


A Delicious Recipe Collection With a Side of History

The Sweet Home Café Cookbook is a fascinating look at African American cooking.

The Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington D.C. isn&apost just home to thousands of historical artifacts, documents, photography, and other media. The museum&aposs restaurant, Sweet Home Café, shows the many ways African Americans have shaped the way our country eats through dishes ranging from Fried Green Tomatoes to Senegalese Peanut Soup, to Hickory-Smoked Pork. Since the museum opened in 2016, the restaurant has become such a popular destination that it now has just released its own cookbook with more than 100 recipes from chefs Albert Lukas and Jerome Grant.

Although the colorful, inviting photographs in Sweet Home Café Cookbook: A Celebration of African American Cooking will inspire you to get in the kitchen, the passages by culinary historian Jessica B. Harris will make you want to sit down and read. Through recipe descriptions and columns on signature ingredients (such as rice, peanuts, and oysters), Harris defines what African American food is. And it isn&apost just Southern food. It&aposs Northern and Western food, too. It&aposs city food and it&aposs country food. And above all, it is global food, with roots that stretch all around the world, including Europe, South America, the Caribbean, and of course, Africa.

WATCH: Meet Dr. Jessica B. Harris

Harris also pays tribute to the creativity and resourcefulness of black cooks, who created some of our country&aposs most beloved and iconic dishes in spite of scarce resources and unimaginable challenges. She writes of enslaved cooks who "perfected special sauces and stayed up nights basting and turning meats they would never taste themselves," and fried chicken that was packed in shoeboxes and carried north and west during the Great Migration. She writes of the significant yet overlooked number of African American cowboys in the Western states. Many were camp cooks, making dishes like Son-of-a-Gun Stew others were more entreprenurial, like Barney Ford, a "failed gold rush prospector turned barber turned restauranteur", who opened a hotel in Denver with a seven-page menu in English and French.

More than just a collection of recipes, Sweet Home Café Cookbook is a fascinating, thoughtful look at African American foodways, and how American food wouldn&apost be nearly as delicious and complex without the many contributions of African American cooks.


A Delicious Recipe Collection With a Side of History

The Sweet Home Café Cookbook is a fascinating look at African American cooking.

The Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington D.C. isn&apost just home to thousands of historical artifacts, documents, photography, and other media. The museum&aposs restaurant, Sweet Home Café, shows the many ways African Americans have shaped the way our country eats through dishes ranging from Fried Green Tomatoes to Senegalese Peanut Soup, to Hickory-Smoked Pork. Since the museum opened in 2016, the restaurant has become such a popular destination that it now has just released its own cookbook with more than 100 recipes from chefs Albert Lukas and Jerome Grant.

Although the colorful, inviting photographs in Sweet Home Café Cookbook: A Celebration of African American Cooking will inspire you to get in the kitchen, the passages by culinary historian Jessica B. Harris will make you want to sit down and read. Through recipe descriptions and columns on signature ingredients (such as rice, peanuts, and oysters), Harris defines what African American food is. And it isn&apost just Southern food. It&aposs Northern and Western food, too. It&aposs city food and it&aposs country food. And above all, it is global food, with roots that stretch all around the world, including Europe, South America, the Caribbean, and of course, Africa.

WATCH: Meet Dr. Jessica B. Harris

Harris also pays tribute to the creativity and resourcefulness of black cooks, who created some of our country&aposs most beloved and iconic dishes in spite of scarce resources and unimaginable challenges. She writes of enslaved cooks who "perfected special sauces and stayed up nights basting and turning meats they would never taste themselves," and fried chicken that was packed in shoeboxes and carried north and west during the Great Migration. She writes of the significant yet overlooked number of African American cowboys in the Western states. Many were camp cooks, making dishes like Son-of-a-Gun Stew others were more entreprenurial, like Barney Ford, a "failed gold rush prospector turned barber turned restauranteur", who opened a hotel in Denver with a seven-page menu in English and French.

More than just a collection of recipes, Sweet Home Café Cookbook is a fascinating, thoughtful look at African American foodways, and how American food wouldn&apost be nearly as delicious and complex without the many contributions of African American cooks.


A Delicious Recipe Collection With a Side of History

The Sweet Home Café Cookbook is a fascinating look at African American cooking.

The Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington D.C. isn&apost just home to thousands of historical artifacts, documents, photography, and other media. The museum&aposs restaurant, Sweet Home Café, shows the many ways African Americans have shaped the way our country eats through dishes ranging from Fried Green Tomatoes to Senegalese Peanut Soup, to Hickory-Smoked Pork. Since the museum opened in 2016, the restaurant has become such a popular destination that it now has just released its own cookbook with more than 100 recipes from chefs Albert Lukas and Jerome Grant.

Although the colorful, inviting photographs in Sweet Home Café Cookbook: A Celebration of African American Cooking will inspire you to get in the kitchen, the passages by culinary historian Jessica B. Harris will make you want to sit down and read. Through recipe descriptions and columns on signature ingredients (such as rice, peanuts, and oysters), Harris defines what African American food is. And it isn&apost just Southern food. It&aposs Northern and Western food, too. It&aposs city food and it&aposs country food. And above all, it is global food, with roots that stretch all around the world, including Europe, South America, the Caribbean, and of course, Africa.

WATCH: Meet Dr. Jessica B. Harris

Harris also pays tribute to the creativity and resourcefulness of black cooks, who created some of our country&aposs most beloved and iconic dishes in spite of scarce resources and unimaginable challenges. She writes of enslaved cooks who "perfected special sauces and stayed up nights basting and turning meats they would never taste themselves," and fried chicken that was packed in shoeboxes and carried north and west during the Great Migration. She writes of the significant yet overlooked number of African American cowboys in the Western states. Many were camp cooks, making dishes like Son-of-a-Gun Stew others were more entreprenurial, like Barney Ford, a "failed gold rush prospector turned barber turned restauranteur", who opened a hotel in Denver with a seven-page menu in English and French.

More than just a collection of recipes, Sweet Home Café Cookbook is a fascinating, thoughtful look at African American foodways, and how American food wouldn&apost be nearly as delicious and complex without the many contributions of African American cooks.


A Delicious Recipe Collection With a Side of History

The Sweet Home Café Cookbook is a fascinating look at African American cooking.

The Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington D.C. isn&apost just home to thousands of historical artifacts, documents, photography, and other media. The museum&aposs restaurant, Sweet Home Café, shows the many ways African Americans have shaped the way our country eats through dishes ranging from Fried Green Tomatoes to Senegalese Peanut Soup, to Hickory-Smoked Pork. Since the museum opened in 2016, the restaurant has become such a popular destination that it now has just released its own cookbook with more than 100 recipes from chefs Albert Lukas and Jerome Grant.

Although the colorful, inviting photographs in Sweet Home Café Cookbook: A Celebration of African American Cooking will inspire you to get in the kitchen, the passages by culinary historian Jessica B. Harris will make you want to sit down and read. Through recipe descriptions and columns on signature ingredients (such as rice, peanuts, and oysters), Harris defines what African American food is. And it isn&apost just Southern food. It&aposs Northern and Western food, too. It&aposs city food and it&aposs country food. And above all, it is global food, with roots that stretch all around the world, including Europe, South America, the Caribbean, and of course, Africa.

WATCH: Meet Dr. Jessica B. Harris

Harris also pays tribute to the creativity and resourcefulness of black cooks, who created some of our country&aposs most beloved and iconic dishes in spite of scarce resources and unimaginable challenges. She writes of enslaved cooks who "perfected special sauces and stayed up nights basting and turning meats they would never taste themselves," and fried chicken that was packed in shoeboxes and carried north and west during the Great Migration. She writes of the significant yet overlooked number of African American cowboys in the Western states. Many were camp cooks, making dishes like Son-of-a-Gun Stew others were more entreprenurial, like Barney Ford, a "failed gold rush prospector turned barber turned restauranteur", who opened a hotel in Denver with a seven-page menu in English and French.

More than just a collection of recipes, Sweet Home Café Cookbook is a fascinating, thoughtful look at African American foodways, and how American food wouldn&apost be nearly as delicious and complex without the many contributions of African American cooks.


A Delicious Recipe Collection With a Side of History

The Sweet Home Café Cookbook is a fascinating look at African American cooking.

The Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington D.C. isn&apost just home to thousands of historical artifacts, documents, photography, and other media. The museum&aposs restaurant, Sweet Home Café, shows the many ways African Americans have shaped the way our country eats through dishes ranging from Fried Green Tomatoes to Senegalese Peanut Soup, to Hickory-Smoked Pork. Since the museum opened in 2016, the restaurant has become such a popular destination that it now has just released its own cookbook with more than 100 recipes from chefs Albert Lukas and Jerome Grant.

Although the colorful, inviting photographs in Sweet Home Café Cookbook: A Celebration of African American Cooking will inspire you to get in the kitchen, the passages by culinary historian Jessica B. Harris will make you want to sit down and read. Through recipe descriptions and columns on signature ingredients (such as rice, peanuts, and oysters), Harris defines what African American food is. And it isn&apost just Southern food. It&aposs Northern and Western food, too. It&aposs city food and it&aposs country food. And above all, it is global food, with roots that stretch all around the world, including Europe, South America, the Caribbean, and of course, Africa.

WATCH: Meet Dr. Jessica B. Harris

Harris also pays tribute to the creativity and resourcefulness of black cooks, who created some of our country&aposs most beloved and iconic dishes in spite of scarce resources and unimaginable challenges. She writes of enslaved cooks who "perfected special sauces and stayed up nights basting and turning meats they would never taste themselves," and fried chicken that was packed in shoeboxes and carried north and west during the Great Migration. She writes of the significant yet overlooked number of African American cowboys in the Western states. Many were camp cooks, making dishes like Son-of-a-Gun Stew others were more entreprenurial, like Barney Ford, a "failed gold rush prospector turned barber turned restauranteur", who opened a hotel in Denver with a seven-page menu in English and French.

More than just a collection of recipes, Sweet Home Café Cookbook is a fascinating, thoughtful look at African American foodways, and how American food wouldn&apost be nearly as delicious and complex without the many contributions of African American cooks.


A Delicious Recipe Collection With a Side of History

The Sweet Home Café Cookbook is a fascinating look at African American cooking.

The Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington D.C. isn&apost just home to thousands of historical artifacts, documents, photography, and other media. The museum&aposs restaurant, Sweet Home Café, shows the many ways African Americans have shaped the way our country eats through dishes ranging from Fried Green Tomatoes to Senegalese Peanut Soup, to Hickory-Smoked Pork. Since the museum opened in 2016, the restaurant has become such a popular destination that it now has just released its own cookbook with more than 100 recipes from chefs Albert Lukas and Jerome Grant.

Although the colorful, inviting photographs in Sweet Home Café Cookbook: A Celebration of African American Cooking will inspire you to get in the kitchen, the passages by culinary historian Jessica B. Harris will make you want to sit down and read. Through recipe descriptions and columns on signature ingredients (such as rice, peanuts, and oysters), Harris defines what African American food is. And it isn&apost just Southern food. It&aposs Northern and Western food, too. It&aposs city food and it&aposs country food. And above all, it is global food, with roots that stretch all around the world, including Europe, South America, the Caribbean, and of course, Africa.

WATCH: Meet Dr. Jessica B. Harris

Harris also pays tribute to the creativity and resourcefulness of black cooks, who created some of our country&aposs most beloved and iconic dishes in spite of scarce resources and unimaginable challenges. She writes of enslaved cooks who "perfected special sauces and stayed up nights basting and turning meats they would never taste themselves," and fried chicken that was packed in shoeboxes and carried north and west during the Great Migration. She writes of the significant yet overlooked number of African American cowboys in the Western states. Many were camp cooks, making dishes like Son-of-a-Gun Stew others were more entreprenurial, like Barney Ford, a "failed gold rush prospector turned barber turned restauranteur", who opened a hotel in Denver with a seven-page menu in English and French.

More than just a collection of recipes, Sweet Home Café Cookbook is a fascinating, thoughtful look at African American foodways, and how American food wouldn&apost be nearly as delicious and complex without the many contributions of African American cooks.


A Delicious Recipe Collection With a Side of History

The Sweet Home Café Cookbook is a fascinating look at African American cooking.

The Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington D.C. isn&apost just home to thousands of historical artifacts, documents, photography, and other media. The museum&aposs restaurant, Sweet Home Café, shows the many ways African Americans have shaped the way our country eats through dishes ranging from Fried Green Tomatoes to Senegalese Peanut Soup, to Hickory-Smoked Pork. Since the museum opened in 2016, the restaurant has become such a popular destination that it now has just released its own cookbook with more than 100 recipes from chefs Albert Lukas and Jerome Grant.

Although the colorful, inviting photographs in Sweet Home Café Cookbook: A Celebration of African American Cooking will inspire you to get in the kitchen, the passages by culinary historian Jessica B. Harris will make you want to sit down and read. Through recipe descriptions and columns on signature ingredients (such as rice, peanuts, and oysters), Harris defines what African American food is. And it isn&apost just Southern food. It&aposs Northern and Western food, too. It&aposs city food and it&aposs country food. And above all, it is global food, with roots that stretch all around the world, including Europe, South America, the Caribbean, and of course, Africa.

WATCH: Meet Dr. Jessica B. Harris

Harris also pays tribute to the creativity and resourcefulness of black cooks, who created some of our country&aposs most beloved and iconic dishes in spite of scarce resources and unimaginable challenges. She writes of enslaved cooks who "perfected special sauces and stayed up nights basting and turning meats they would never taste themselves," and fried chicken that was packed in shoeboxes and carried north and west during the Great Migration. She writes of the significant yet overlooked number of African American cowboys in the Western states. Many were camp cooks, making dishes like Son-of-a-Gun Stew others were more entreprenurial, like Barney Ford, a "failed gold rush prospector turned barber turned restauranteur", who opened a hotel in Denver with a seven-page menu in English and French.

More than just a collection of recipes, Sweet Home Café Cookbook is a fascinating, thoughtful look at African American foodways, and how American food wouldn&apost be nearly as delicious and complex without the many contributions of African American cooks.


A Delicious Recipe Collection With a Side of History

The Sweet Home Café Cookbook is a fascinating look at African American cooking.

The Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington D.C. isn&apost just home to thousands of historical artifacts, documents, photography, and other media. The museum&aposs restaurant, Sweet Home Café, shows the many ways African Americans have shaped the way our country eats through dishes ranging from Fried Green Tomatoes to Senegalese Peanut Soup, to Hickory-Smoked Pork. Since the museum opened in 2016, the restaurant has become such a popular destination that it now has just released its own cookbook with more than 100 recipes from chefs Albert Lukas and Jerome Grant.

Although the colorful, inviting photographs in Sweet Home Café Cookbook: A Celebration of African American Cooking will inspire you to get in the kitchen, the passages by culinary historian Jessica B. Harris will make you want to sit down and read. Through recipe descriptions and columns on signature ingredients (such as rice, peanuts, and oysters), Harris defines what African American food is. And it isn&apost just Southern food. It&aposs Northern and Western food, too. It&aposs city food and it&aposs country food. And above all, it is global food, with roots that stretch all around the world, including Europe, South America, the Caribbean, and of course, Africa.

WATCH: Meet Dr. Jessica B. Harris

Harris also pays tribute to the creativity and resourcefulness of black cooks, who created some of our country&aposs most beloved and iconic dishes in spite of scarce resources and unimaginable challenges. She writes of enslaved cooks who "perfected special sauces and stayed up nights basting and turning meats they would never taste themselves," and fried chicken that was packed in shoeboxes and carried north and west during the Great Migration. She writes of the significant yet overlooked number of African American cowboys in the Western states. Many were camp cooks, making dishes like Son-of-a-Gun Stew others were more entreprenurial, like Barney Ford, a "failed gold rush prospector turned barber turned restauranteur", who opened a hotel in Denver with a seven-page menu in English and French.

More than just a collection of recipes, Sweet Home Café Cookbook is a fascinating, thoughtful look at African American foodways, and how American food wouldn&apost be nearly as delicious and complex without the many contributions of African American cooks.


A Delicious Recipe Collection With a Side of History

The Sweet Home Café Cookbook is a fascinating look at African American cooking.

The Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington D.C. isn&apost just home to thousands of historical artifacts, documents, photography, and other media. The museum&aposs restaurant, Sweet Home Café, shows the many ways African Americans have shaped the way our country eats through dishes ranging from Fried Green Tomatoes to Senegalese Peanut Soup, to Hickory-Smoked Pork. Since the museum opened in 2016, the restaurant has become such a popular destination that it now has just released its own cookbook with more than 100 recipes from chefs Albert Lukas and Jerome Grant.

Although the colorful, inviting photographs in Sweet Home Café Cookbook: A Celebration of African American Cooking will inspire you to get in the kitchen, the passages by culinary historian Jessica B. Harris will make you want to sit down and read. Through recipe descriptions and columns on signature ingredients (such as rice, peanuts, and oysters), Harris defines what African American food is. And it isn&apost just Southern food. It&aposs Northern and Western food, too. It&aposs city food and it&aposs country food. And above all, it is global food, with roots that stretch all around the world, including Europe, South America, the Caribbean, and of course, Africa.

WATCH: Meet Dr. Jessica B. Harris

Harris also pays tribute to the creativity and resourcefulness of black cooks, who created some of our country&aposs most beloved and iconic dishes in spite of scarce resources and unimaginable challenges. She writes of enslaved cooks who "perfected special sauces and stayed up nights basting and turning meats they would never taste themselves," and fried chicken that was packed in shoeboxes and carried north and west during the Great Migration. She writes of the significant yet overlooked number of African American cowboys in the Western states. Many were camp cooks, making dishes like Son-of-a-Gun Stew others were more entreprenurial, like Barney Ford, a "failed gold rush prospector turned barber turned restauranteur", who opened a hotel in Denver with a seven-page menu in English and French.

More than just a collection of recipes, Sweet Home Café Cookbook is a fascinating, thoughtful look at African American foodways, and how American food wouldn&apost be nearly as delicious and complex without the many contributions of African American cooks.


Watch the video: Home sweet home at cozy McFarland café