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Cranberry Sauce with Dried Apricots and Cardamom

Cranberry Sauce with Dried Apricots and Cardamom


Makes about 4 1/2 cups Servings

Ingredients

  • 8 whole green cardamom pods
  • 1 3/4 cups canned apricot nectar
  • 1/2 cup apricot preserves
  • 1/3 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 1 6-ounce package dried apricots, quartered
  • 1 12-ounce bag cranberries
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons grated lemon peel

Recipe Preparation

  • Coarsely crush cardamom in mortar with pestle or place in resealable plastic bag and crush with rolling pin; discard skins.

  • Bring next 5 ingredients and cardamom to boil in heavy large saucepan over medium-high heat, stirring until sugar dissolves. Add apricots; cook 2 minutes. Add cranberries and cook until berries pop, stirring occasionally, about 9 minutes. Transfer to bowl. Mix in lemon peel. Cover and refrigerate overnight. DO AHEAD Can be made 1 week ahead. Keep refrigerated. Serve cold or at room temperature.

Reviews Section

Servings Makes 2 1/2 cups (serving size: 2 tbsp.)

Amount Per Serving Calories 67 Calories from Fat 0.7 % Daily Value * Total Fat 0.1g 1 % Saturated Fat 0.0g 0 % Cholesterol 0.0mg 0 % Sodium 64mg 3 % Total Carbohydrate 17g 6 % Dietary Fiber 1.8g 8 % Protein 0.2g 1 %

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily value may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.


Spiced cranberry chutney with apricots and pecans

Get a jump on your Thanksgiving meal planning by making this cranberry chutney in advance.

Prepare chutney ahead of time so flavors can develop. Remember this is not a treacly sauce. It relies only on dried fruit and juices for sweetness. Leftovers make a great condiment for lamb, chicken thighs, or goat cheese or as a yogurt topping.

A couple of notes about the sauce: If you can’t find ground fennel, finely crush fennel seeds with a heavy-bottomed saucepan (or mince with a sharp chef’s knife). You can also substitute an equal amount of ground star anise for the fennel. And if you’re looking for a shortcut, Lior gives permission to substitute 1-1/2 teaspoons Pumpkin Pie Spice or Apple Pie Spice blend (or even curry powder or garam masala for the more adventurous) for all of the spices.

Lior Lev Sercarz’s Spiced Cranberry Chutney With Apricots and Pecans
Serves 6 to 8

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon each: ground fennel and ground cardamom
1/8 teaspoon each: ground cloves and ground ginger
Pinch cayenne pepper
1/2 cup apple cider
1/4 cup pomegranate juice
1 bag (12 ounces) fresh or frozen cranberries
1/2 cup dried cranberries
1/4 cup dried apricots, cut into small dice
1/4 cup toasted pecans, chopped coarse
2 teaspoons finely grated orange zest

Mix spices bring cider, pomegranate juice, and spice blend to a boil in a large saucepan. Add cranberries and return to a boil, cooking until some of the cranberries just start to pop, 3 to 5 minutes. Remove from heat.

Meanwhile, mix dried cranberries, apricots, pecans, and orange zest in a medium bowl. Add cooked cranberries to the dried fruits toss gently to coat. Cool and refrigerate until ready to use (Can be covered and refrigerated up to 5 days.)

Make sure to squirrel away some of the cranberry sauce to dollop on goat cheese-topped toasted baguette or crackers.


Lior’s Spiced Cranberry Chutney With Apricots and Pecans

Prepare chutney ahead of time so flavors can develop. Remember this is not a treacly sauce. It relies only on dried fruit and juices for sweetness. Leftovers make a great condiment for lamb, chicken thighs, or goat cheese or as a yogurt topping.

A couple of notes about the sauce: if you can’t find ground fennel, finely crush fennel seeds with a heavy-bottomed saucepan (or mince with a sharp chef’s knife). You can also substitute an equal amount of ground star anise for the fennel. And if you’re looking for a shortcut, Lior gives permission to substitute 1 1/2 teaspoons Pumpkin Pie Spice or Apple Pie Spice blend (or even curry powder or garam masala for the more adventurous) for all of the spices.

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon each: ground fennel and ground cardamom
1/8 teaspoon each: ground cloves and ground ginger
Pinch cayenne pepper
1/2 cup apple cider
1/4 cup pomegranate juice
1 bag (12 ounces) fresh or frozen cranberries
1/2 cup dried cranberries
1/4 cup dried apricots, cut into small dice
1/4 cup toasted pecans, chopped coarse
2 teaspoons finely grated orange zest

Mix spices bring cider, pomegranate juice, and spice blend to a boil in a large saucepan. Add cranberries and return to a boil, cooking until some of the cranberries just start to pop, 3 to 5 minutes. Remove from heat.

Meanwhile, mix dried cranberries, apricots, pecans, and orange zest in a medium bowl. Add cooked cranberries to the dried fruits toss gently to coat. Cool and refrigerate until ready to use (Can be covered and refrigerated up to 5 days.)

Make sure to squirrel away some of the cranberry sauce to dollop on goat cheese-topped toasted baguette or crackers.


How to Make Cranberry Sauce

Combine one package (12 oz/340 g) cranberries with 1 cup (250 mL) water and 1 cup (250 mL) sugar in a medium saucepan. Bring to a boil reduce heat and cook over medium heat until cranberries pop and mixture thickens, about 10 - 15 minutes. Refrigerate for up to seven days.

Try adding any of the following ingredients to canned cranberry sauce:

  • Freshly grated peel from oranges or lemons
  • Chopped fresh fruits, such as pears, pineapple, apples or mangoes
  • Chopped dried fruits, such as apricots, cherries or blueberries
  • Chopped fresh herbs, such as rosemary or thyme
  • Ground allspice, cardamom, cinnamon, cloves or nutmeg to taste
  • Coarsely chopped toasted nuts, such as walnuts or pecans
  • A favourite liqueur or wine, such as Grand Marnier, kirsch, Madeira or port

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Cranberry Sauce with Dried Apricots and Cardamom - Recipes

Apricot and Cardamom Coconut Slice
(recipe sourced from Weight Watchers Magazine August 2010)

Serves: 16
Points per serve: 3 1/2

cooking spray
1 1/2 cups caster sugar
110 grams reduced fat butter
2 x 200 gram tubs Neslte Diet Apricot yoghurt (reduced fat)
1 1/2 cups self raising flour
1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom
1 x 400 gram can Weight Watchers Halved Apricots, drained, coarsely chopped
1/4 cup rolled oats
1/4 cup shredded coconut
2 tablespoons brown sugar

Preheat oven to 180 degrees Celsius.

Lightly spray and line a 20 cm square slice tin with cooking spray and line with baking paper.

Beat sugar and butter in a large bowl with an electric mixer for 3 minutes or until creamy. Add eggs one at a time, beating well between each addition. Stir in apricot yoghurt until well combined. Fold in the flour and cardamom.

Spoon into prepared tin and smooth top. Arrange apricots evenly over top. Combine rolled oats, coconut and sugar in a small bowl. Sprinkle dry ingredients over apricots.

Bake for 30 - 35 minutes or until golden brown and cooked when tested with a skewer. Remove slice from oven and stand for 5 minutes before turning out. Cut into 16 squares.


A Mix of Tradition + Something New

Thanksgiving tables call out for cranberries, especially when turkey is the main course. While canned cranberry sauces are easy, a few simple recipes can make the difference between "convenient and delicious" and only "convenient".

For Thanksgiving this year, consider serving a duo of cranberry condiments.

For the traditionalists in the family, the first choice is your home’s customary cranberry dish, whatever it is. If it's a can of jellied cranberry? Go for it, it's tradition. But then stretch to something new.

May I suggest Cranberry Chutney both for the table and for a homemade food gift for teachers, neighbors and friends? My friend Cindy says she invites me to Thanksgiving dinner, knowing I'll bring an extra jar just for her!

And one cranberry lover, who shall remain anonymous, has been known to take a spoonful or two or three straight from the fridge. Cranberry Chutney is that good!


Cranberry Sauce with Dried Apricots and Cardamom - Recipes

  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 30 minutes
  • Serving: Serves 04

Stuffed Chicken with Camembert and Cranberry Sauce

Christmas is a time of celebration, which includes lots of indulgences like this lovely rolled chicken breast with Camembert and cranberry sauce. It is served up with roast potatoes and makes a lovely dinner for the whole family. For a bit of a change, you could also make this with turkey breasts instead.

Recipe Tester Feedback: "Delicious stuffed chicken breast, good enough for Christmas lunch!" - Jenny

No: Gluten / Egg / Nuts
Contains: Dairy

Preparation Time 10 minutes
Cooking Time 30 minutes
Serves 4
Cannot be frozen


Salted sugared spiced™

Of course, this would be one of those recipes I wouldn't share what the ingredients were until everyone had tasted it. Not because there was anything unusual in it, but because the combination of ingredients might give some pause before they even tried it (you know who these people are in your life). If you haven't guessed by now, I enjoy maintaining my 'taste first, tell later' philosophy when something new is being served. Particularly when this something new means a change is being made at the Thanksgiving table. Thankfully, this change was so well received I am convinced there would be a few unhappy campers if something other than spiced cranberry and dried fruit chutney was placed on the holiday dinner table.

Fresh cranberries, I have learned, come in various sizes. Some of the cranberries coming out of the bogs on the Cape are the size of large grapes and gorgeous, however, most cranberries are the size of marbles. Regardless of their size or shape, cranberries are not only one of the most beautiful fruits, they are considered by some to be a 'superfruit' due to their nutrient content and antioxidant qualities. Finally, I like a food that is actually good for you!

A few weeks back I created a game of sorts with the only players being my niece and nephew. Once a week I text them a photo from an experience occurring during their childhood. The game part comes in when they have to identify its' location. The sibling who gets the location correct first receives a financial reward (we aren't talking alot of money here, just the kind of money that comes in handy for a college kid and just enough to peak their interest while indulging their aunt in this endeavor). With one of them in the eastern time zone and the other on mountain time, the timing of sending these texts has been the most challenging aspect of the game (because they are all about having it be fair, competitiveness is in their DNA).

Early on in their lives, they spent an incredible amount of time with us and almost every experience was photographed with a camera (cell phones with cameras weren't around back then, which really wasn't that long ago). I had wanted to capture these experiences in film, so that someday they could look back at the photos and remember their time spent at zoos, museums, county fairs, and on trips with an aunt and uncle who loved them very much. For me and hopefully for them, each of these experiences are (or will someday be) seen as the things that created the (indestructible) foundation of the relationship we have with one another today.

Now that they are in college and the amount of time spent with them is considerably less than it was when they were younger, I have sought to find (and not leave to chance) creative ways to continue to keep our connections with one another strong. So the game for me is just another way for me to remind them how much they have always been loved as well as a way of creating another memory between us as well as them. While it thrills me when they remember the events or places we went to, it thrills me even more to know that the quality of relationship we have with one another today came as a result of the time spent together. Finding ways to spend time and engage with these busy college kids on top of my busy life over the years hasn't always been easy. But every now and then, I need to make sure there are no cracks in the proverbial (relationship) foundation by creating new memories, even ones as seemingly silly as the game they are now playing.


SAGE AND APRICOT NUT ROAST WITH CRANBERRY SAUCE

Start by making the nut roast. Mix the milled flaxseed in a small bowl and leave to sit for 5-10 minutes until it expands and turns gluey. Put to one side ready for later.

Crush the garlic and add to a big pan with some olive oil, heat until the garlic starts to golden. Finely chop all the veg and apricots, add to the pan and cook for a few minutes. Add all the herbs. Once all cooked through take off the heat and put to one side, roughly 10 minutes.

Add all the nuts to a food processor and blend until they’re crumbled down but not so much that it turns into a flour you want the pieces of nuts to still be a bit chunky, like pine nut size. Best to use the pulse setting on the processor to make sure they remain chunky.

Combine the cooked veg, nuts, flour and flax together and mix well. Place in a lined loaf tin and push down/compress into the tin well (you may want to use a masher for this!). Place in the oven and bake for 50 minutes on the middle shelf.

Whilst the roast is baking, make the cranberry sauce.

Squeeze the orange and then place the orange juice, coconut sugar and maple syrup into a pan, bring to the boil and then add the cranberries. Heat for about 10 minutes until the cranberries start to burst. Then simmer for another 10 minutes and allow the liquid to reduce, until it reaches your desired thickness.

Once the roast is done, remove it from the oven and leave it to bind for about 20 minutes before slicing and serving with a thick spread of sweet cranberry sauce!