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Pasta Con ‘Nduja

Pasta Con ‘Nduja


Cook the peppers in a frying pan with a small amount of olive oil, add salt to taste. Once they are cooked, place in a rather large container, add the boiled potato and milk, blend with an immersion blender until it becomes creamy.

Put the soft bread, the garlic clove without the core, the parsley and a dash of extra virgin olive oil in a blender. Spread the mixture in a pan and bake for 7-8 minutes at 300 degrees F until it is crispy.

To prepare the seasoning of the pasta, add a dash of extra virgin olive oil to the pan and a very fine mirepoix of vegetables (celery, carrot and onion). Once it is sautéed, add the ‘nduja and turn off the heat, continuing to mix the sauce.

Toss the pasta into salted boiling water. When it is cooked, drain it keeping a ladle of pasta water aside, and add to the sauce.

At that point, sauté in the pan adding the ladle of pasta water.

Plate the pasta adding the cream of peppers as the base, gently resting a portion of pasta on top and finish by adding the crispy tasty bread.


HOW TO MAKE ‘NDUJA

‘Nduja: the spicy, creamy, spreadable salami, is a distinctly Calabrian product, but only certain areas of Calabria. The most famous of these is Vibo Valentia, the home province of my Zia Agnese, who taught me this recipe.

There a many uses for ‘nduja. We eat it on toasted Calabrian bread (crostini), pizza, and semi-matured cheeses, and in frittatas and pasta sauces. Fileja con ‘nduja (a Calabrian handmade pasta) and Zuppa di Fagioli con ‘nduja (a traditional bean soup) are common dishes.

The origin of its odd name stems from the Latin inducere, meaning “to insert.” Etymologically it’s connected with two other salami insaccati: salam dla doja from Piedmont and Andouille from France.

Since the term is likely of French origin, some date the invention of ‘nduja during the Napoleonic period (1806-1815). Others believe it was the Spaniards who introduced it when they brought the peppers to Calabria for the first time. Whatever the true story may be, it’s unclear to us today, hidden in the tales of the older generation and conflicting official histories.


HOW TO MAKE ‘NDUJA

‘Nduja: the spicy, creamy, spreadable salami, is a distinctly Calabrian product, but only certain areas of Calabria. The most famous of these is Vibo Valentia, the home province of my Zia Agnese, who taught me this recipe.

There a many uses for ‘nduja. We eat it on toasted Calabrian bread (crostini), pizza, and semi-matured cheeses, and in frittatas and pasta sauces. Fileja con ‘nduja (a Calabrian handmade pasta) and Zuppa di Fagioli con ‘nduja (a traditional bean soup) are common dishes.

The origin of its odd name stems from the Latin inducere, meaning “to insert.” Etymologically it’s connected with two other salami insaccati: salam dla doja from Piedmont and Andouille from France.

Since the term is likely of French origin, some date the invention of ‘nduja during the Napoleonic period (1806-1815). Others believe it was the Spaniards who introduced it when they brought the peppers to Calabria for the first time. Whatever the true story may be, it’s unclear to us today, hidden in the tales of the older generation and conflicting official histories.


HOW TO MAKE ‘NDUJA

‘Nduja: the spicy, creamy, spreadable salami, is a distinctly Calabrian product, but only certain areas of Calabria. The most famous of these is Vibo Valentia, the home province of my Zia Agnese, who taught me this recipe.

There a many uses for ‘nduja. We eat it on toasted Calabrian bread (crostini), pizza, and semi-matured cheeses, and in frittatas and pasta sauces. Fileja con ‘nduja (a Calabrian handmade pasta) and Zuppa di Fagioli con ‘nduja (a traditional bean soup) are common dishes.

The origin of its odd name stems from the Latin inducere, meaning “to insert.” Etymologically it’s connected with two other salami insaccati: salam dla doja from Piedmont and Andouille from France.

Since the term is likely of French origin, some date the invention of ‘nduja during the Napoleonic period (1806-1815). Others believe it was the Spaniards who introduced it when they brought the peppers to Calabria for the first time. Whatever the true story may be, it’s unclear to us today, hidden in the tales of the older generation and conflicting official histories.


HOW TO MAKE ‘NDUJA

‘Nduja: the spicy, creamy, spreadable salami, is a distinctly Calabrian product, but only certain areas of Calabria. The most famous of these is Vibo Valentia, the home province of my Zia Agnese, who taught me this recipe.

There a many uses for ‘nduja. We eat it on toasted Calabrian bread (crostini), pizza, and semi-matured cheeses, and in frittatas and pasta sauces. Fileja con ‘nduja (a Calabrian handmade pasta) and Zuppa di Fagioli con ‘nduja (a traditional bean soup) are common dishes.

The origin of its odd name stems from the Latin inducere, meaning “to insert.” Etymologically it’s connected with two other salami insaccati: salam dla doja from Piedmont and Andouille from France.

Since the term is likely of French origin, some date the invention of ‘nduja during the Napoleonic period (1806-1815). Others believe it was the Spaniards who introduced it when they brought the peppers to Calabria for the first time. Whatever the true story may be, it’s unclear to us today, hidden in the tales of the older generation and conflicting official histories.


HOW TO MAKE ‘NDUJA

‘Nduja: the spicy, creamy, spreadable salami, is a distinctly Calabrian product, but only certain areas of Calabria. The most famous of these is Vibo Valentia, the home province of my Zia Agnese, who taught me this recipe.

There a many uses for ‘nduja. We eat it on toasted Calabrian bread (crostini), pizza, and semi-matured cheeses, and in frittatas and pasta sauces. Fileja con ‘nduja (a Calabrian handmade pasta) and Zuppa di Fagioli con ‘nduja (a traditional bean soup) are common dishes.

The origin of its odd name stems from the Latin inducere, meaning “to insert.” Etymologically it’s connected with two other salami insaccati: salam dla doja from Piedmont and Andouille from France.

Since the term is likely of French origin, some date the invention of ‘nduja during the Napoleonic period (1806-1815). Others believe it was the Spaniards who introduced it when they brought the peppers to Calabria for the first time. Whatever the true story may be, it’s unclear to us today, hidden in the tales of the older generation and conflicting official histories.


HOW TO MAKE ‘NDUJA

‘Nduja: the spicy, creamy, spreadable salami, is a distinctly Calabrian product, but only certain areas of Calabria. The most famous of these is Vibo Valentia, the home province of my Zia Agnese, who taught me this recipe.

There a many uses for ‘nduja. We eat it on toasted Calabrian bread (crostini), pizza, and semi-matured cheeses, and in frittatas and pasta sauces. Fileja con ‘nduja (a Calabrian handmade pasta) and Zuppa di Fagioli con ‘nduja (a traditional bean soup) are common dishes.

The origin of its odd name stems from the Latin inducere, meaning “to insert.” Etymologically it’s connected with two other salami insaccati: salam dla doja from Piedmont and Andouille from France.

Since the term is likely of French origin, some date the invention of ‘nduja during the Napoleonic period (1806-1815). Others believe it was the Spaniards who introduced it when they brought the peppers to Calabria for the first time. Whatever the true story may be, it’s unclear to us today, hidden in the tales of the older generation and conflicting official histories.


HOW TO MAKE ‘NDUJA

‘Nduja: the spicy, creamy, spreadable salami, is a distinctly Calabrian product, but only certain areas of Calabria. The most famous of these is Vibo Valentia, the home province of my Zia Agnese, who taught me this recipe.

There a many uses for ‘nduja. We eat it on toasted Calabrian bread (crostini), pizza, and semi-matured cheeses, and in frittatas and pasta sauces. Fileja con ‘nduja (a Calabrian handmade pasta) and Zuppa di Fagioli con ‘nduja (a traditional bean soup) are common dishes.

The origin of its odd name stems from the Latin inducere, meaning “to insert.” Etymologically it’s connected with two other salami insaccati: salam dla doja from Piedmont and Andouille from France.

Since the term is likely of French origin, some date the invention of ‘nduja during the Napoleonic period (1806-1815). Others believe it was the Spaniards who introduced it when they brought the peppers to Calabria for the first time. Whatever the true story may be, it’s unclear to us today, hidden in the tales of the older generation and conflicting official histories.


HOW TO MAKE ‘NDUJA

‘Nduja: the spicy, creamy, spreadable salami, is a distinctly Calabrian product, but only certain areas of Calabria. The most famous of these is Vibo Valentia, the home province of my Zia Agnese, who taught me this recipe.

There a many uses for ‘nduja. We eat it on toasted Calabrian bread (crostini), pizza, and semi-matured cheeses, and in frittatas and pasta sauces. Fileja con ‘nduja (a Calabrian handmade pasta) and Zuppa di Fagioli con ‘nduja (a traditional bean soup) are common dishes.

The origin of its odd name stems from the Latin inducere, meaning “to insert.” Etymologically it’s connected with two other salami insaccati: salam dla doja from Piedmont and Andouille from France.

Since the term is likely of French origin, some date the invention of ‘nduja during the Napoleonic period (1806-1815). Others believe it was the Spaniards who introduced it when they brought the peppers to Calabria for the first time. Whatever the true story may be, it’s unclear to us today, hidden in the tales of the older generation and conflicting official histories.


HOW TO MAKE ‘NDUJA

‘Nduja: the spicy, creamy, spreadable salami, is a distinctly Calabrian product, but only certain areas of Calabria. The most famous of these is Vibo Valentia, the home province of my Zia Agnese, who taught me this recipe.

There a many uses for ‘nduja. We eat it on toasted Calabrian bread (crostini), pizza, and semi-matured cheeses, and in frittatas and pasta sauces. Fileja con ‘nduja (a Calabrian handmade pasta) and Zuppa di Fagioli con ‘nduja (a traditional bean soup) are common dishes.

The origin of its odd name stems from the Latin inducere, meaning “to insert.” Etymologically it’s connected with two other salami insaccati: salam dla doja from Piedmont and Andouille from France.

Since the term is likely of French origin, some date the invention of ‘nduja during the Napoleonic period (1806-1815). Others believe it was the Spaniards who introduced it when they brought the peppers to Calabria for the first time. Whatever the true story may be, it’s unclear to us today, hidden in the tales of the older generation and conflicting official histories.


HOW TO MAKE ‘NDUJA

‘Nduja: the spicy, creamy, spreadable salami, is a distinctly Calabrian product, but only certain areas of Calabria. The most famous of these is Vibo Valentia, the home province of my Zia Agnese, who taught me this recipe.

There a many uses for ‘nduja. We eat it on toasted Calabrian bread (crostini), pizza, and semi-matured cheeses, and in frittatas and pasta sauces. Fileja con ‘nduja (a Calabrian handmade pasta) and Zuppa di Fagioli con ‘nduja (a traditional bean soup) are common dishes.

The origin of its odd name stems from the Latin inducere, meaning “to insert.” Etymologically it’s connected with two other salami insaccati: salam dla doja from Piedmont and Andouille from France.

Since the term is likely of French origin, some date the invention of ‘nduja during the Napoleonic period (1806-1815). Others believe it was the Spaniards who introduced it when they brought the peppers to Calabria for the first time. Whatever the true story may be, it’s unclear to us today, hidden in the tales of the older generation and conflicting official histories.