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One for the Road: Charleston, South Carolina

One for the Road: Charleston, South Carolina


I was recently on a road trip and made a pit stop in Charleston, S.C. I was on vacation and had no intention of tasting cocktails (that’s what I do for my day job), but the restaurant I chose for dinner, FIG, has incredible drinks. And I recognized the bar manager, Brooks Reitz, who I’d met a couple times before at events like Tales of the Cocktail. After a fantastic meal and a few tipples, he sent me off with the names of establishments I needed to check out in town. Here are some of the places I visited that night.

The Cocktail Club, 479 King Street:
While the drinks are serious, the mood at this stylish watering hole is fun and approachable. Jasmine Beck and her team make all the classics, but I suggest you order something that incorporates a house-made infusion or complex syrup instead.
What to Drink: Married to a Mixologist (Poema Cava, spiced beet maple syrup, Cointreau, lemon juice)

FIG, 232 Meeting Street, 843-805-5900:
The James Beard Award-winning FIG (pictured above) was the perfect start to my evening. Its mixologist, Brooks Reitz, is quite talented and has put together an impressive cocktail list, including nine twists on the Negroni, a build-your-own Manhattan section, and original concoctions.
What to Drink: Hummingbird (Beefeater Gin, Campari, St-Germain, Noilly Prat Sweet Vermouth)

The Gin Joint, 182 East Bay Street, 843-577-6111:
At The Gin Joint, I learned that Jerry Thomas, our bartending forefather, had roots in Charleston. The establishment has taken this to heart and has done a great job of capturing the essence of cocktail culture throughout the ages. The thorough menu features standards such as fizzes, swizzles, daisies, sours, slings, smashes, coolers, and "fancy cocktails," and there’s always a punch of the week. If you only have time for a single stop, this should be it.
What to Drink: The Original New Orleans Fizz (Plymouth Gin, lemon, lime, orange flower water, egg white, cream)

Check out Simon Ford’s complete guide for more great Charleston establishments.

Simon Ford is an award-winning bartender and director of trade outreach and brand education for Pernod Ricard USA. He is also a Liquor.com advisor.

This article was originally published at One for the Road: Charleston, S.C. For more stories like this, subscribe to Liquor.com for the best of all things cocktails and spirits.


Shrimp and Grits with Chef Frank Lee

Over the years, shrimp and grits has gained widespread popularity across the country. A large reason for that growth is the continual creativity and culinary excellence cooked up from several chefs in South Carolina. Chef Frank Lee is a shining example of this, helping shrimp and grits' popularity soar nationwide.

Chef Lee has had a major influence on the culinary scene in South Carolina, starting in Charleston. Several of the chefs he has worked with and mentored over the years have gone on to run their own kitchens, from Charleston to Columbia to Greenville.

Chef Lee has also had a major influence on the menu at one of South Carolina's most iconic restaurants, Slightly North of Broad, or "SNOB," as the locals like to refer to it. Slightly North of Broad is part of Hall Management Group, which is an array of restaurants dedicated to sharing unique culinary experiences and Southern culture.

Chef Lee has always placed a large emphasis on local ingredients-from fresh produce to meat and seafood. This, paired with his French techniques learned while traveling and dining throughout Europe, has helped form Slightly North of Broad's famous shrimp and grits dish, the most popular item on an already mouthwatering menu.

SHRIMP AND GRITS (recipe courtesy of Frank Lee)

Shrimp Stock

Tools needed: 2-gallon pot, fine chinois

4 cups shrimp shells (2 pounds shrimp)

1 cup carrot, medium diced

1 cup fresh tomato, medium diced

Remaining Ingredients

4 ounces country ham, julienned

4 ounces kielbasa sausage

20 shrimp, peeled and deveined

1 cup fresh tomato, peeled, seeded and medium diced

MAKE THE GRITS

Bring water, salt and 1 tablespoon butter to a boil.

Stir in grits. Reduce heat to low and cook, covered, stirring occasionally until grits are thick and creamy.

After about 40 minutes, remove from heat and finish by stirring in cream and the remaining butter. Keep warm until ready to serve.

MAKE THE STOCK

Toast the shrimp shells in olive oil in the 2-gallon pot until pink and fragrant.

Add the onion, carrot, celery and fennel seed and cook without burning until the vegetables relax, giving up some of their rigidity.

Add the tomato and garlic and cook for 5 minutes.

Add the water, bring to a boil, skim and simmer for 30 minutes. Strain through a fine chinois.

If you can get local shrimp with the heads on, use them! The heads are where most of the flavor is.

ADD THE REMAINING INGREDIENTS

Brown the ham and sausage with 1 tablespoon of butter.

Add the shrimp, garlic and Cajun spice, and saute without burning the spice (2 minutes).

Add the tomatoes and green onion, continuing to saute until the tomato renders some juice.

Moisten with the shrimp stock and bring to a bubble (not a boil), and finish with butter.


Shrimp and Grits with Chef Frank Lee

Over the years, shrimp and grits has gained widespread popularity across the country. A large reason for that growth is the continual creativity and culinary excellence cooked up from several chefs in South Carolina. Chef Frank Lee is a shining example of this, helping shrimp and grits' popularity soar nationwide.

Chef Lee has had a major influence on the culinary scene in South Carolina, starting in Charleston. Several of the chefs he has worked with and mentored over the years have gone on to run their own kitchens, from Charleston to Columbia to Greenville.

Chef Lee has also had a major influence on the menu at one of South Carolina's most iconic restaurants, Slightly North of Broad, or "SNOB," as the locals like to refer to it. Slightly North of Broad is part of Hall Management Group, which is an array of restaurants dedicated to sharing unique culinary experiences and Southern culture.

Chef Lee has always placed a large emphasis on local ingredients-from fresh produce to meat and seafood. This, paired with his French techniques learned while traveling and dining throughout Europe, has helped form Slightly North of Broad's famous shrimp and grits dish, the most popular item on an already mouthwatering menu.

SHRIMP AND GRITS (recipe courtesy of Frank Lee)

Shrimp Stock

Tools needed: 2-gallon pot, fine chinois

4 cups shrimp shells (2 pounds shrimp)

1 cup carrot, medium diced

1 cup fresh tomato, medium diced

Remaining Ingredients

4 ounces country ham, julienned

4 ounces kielbasa sausage

20 shrimp, peeled and deveined

1 cup fresh tomato, peeled, seeded and medium diced

MAKE THE GRITS

Bring water, salt and 1 tablespoon butter to a boil.

Stir in grits. Reduce heat to low and cook, covered, stirring occasionally until grits are thick and creamy.

After about 40 minutes, remove from heat and finish by stirring in cream and the remaining butter. Keep warm until ready to serve.

MAKE THE STOCK

Toast the shrimp shells in olive oil in the 2-gallon pot until pink and fragrant.

Add the onion, carrot, celery and fennel seed and cook without burning until the vegetables relax, giving up some of their rigidity.

Add the tomato and garlic and cook for 5 minutes.

Add the water, bring to a boil, skim and simmer for 30 minutes. Strain through a fine chinois.

If you can get local shrimp with the heads on, use them! The heads are where most of the flavor is.

ADD THE REMAINING INGREDIENTS

Brown the ham and sausage with 1 tablespoon of butter.

Add the shrimp, garlic and Cajun spice, and saute without burning the spice (2 minutes).

Add the tomatoes and green onion, continuing to saute until the tomato renders some juice.

Moisten with the shrimp stock and bring to a bubble (not a boil), and finish with butter.


Shrimp and Grits with Chef Frank Lee

Over the years, shrimp and grits has gained widespread popularity across the country. A large reason for that growth is the continual creativity and culinary excellence cooked up from several chefs in South Carolina. Chef Frank Lee is a shining example of this, helping shrimp and grits' popularity soar nationwide.

Chef Lee has had a major influence on the culinary scene in South Carolina, starting in Charleston. Several of the chefs he has worked with and mentored over the years have gone on to run their own kitchens, from Charleston to Columbia to Greenville.

Chef Lee has also had a major influence on the menu at one of South Carolina's most iconic restaurants, Slightly North of Broad, or "SNOB," as the locals like to refer to it. Slightly North of Broad is part of Hall Management Group, which is an array of restaurants dedicated to sharing unique culinary experiences and Southern culture.

Chef Lee has always placed a large emphasis on local ingredients-from fresh produce to meat and seafood. This, paired with his French techniques learned while traveling and dining throughout Europe, has helped form Slightly North of Broad's famous shrimp and grits dish, the most popular item on an already mouthwatering menu.

SHRIMP AND GRITS (recipe courtesy of Frank Lee)

Shrimp Stock

Tools needed: 2-gallon pot, fine chinois

4 cups shrimp shells (2 pounds shrimp)

1 cup carrot, medium diced

1 cup fresh tomato, medium diced

Remaining Ingredients

4 ounces country ham, julienned

4 ounces kielbasa sausage

20 shrimp, peeled and deveined

1 cup fresh tomato, peeled, seeded and medium diced

MAKE THE GRITS

Bring water, salt and 1 tablespoon butter to a boil.

Stir in grits. Reduce heat to low and cook, covered, stirring occasionally until grits are thick and creamy.

After about 40 minutes, remove from heat and finish by stirring in cream and the remaining butter. Keep warm until ready to serve.

MAKE THE STOCK

Toast the shrimp shells in olive oil in the 2-gallon pot until pink and fragrant.

Add the onion, carrot, celery and fennel seed and cook without burning until the vegetables relax, giving up some of their rigidity.

Add the tomato and garlic and cook for 5 minutes.

Add the water, bring to a boil, skim and simmer for 30 minutes. Strain through a fine chinois.

If you can get local shrimp with the heads on, use them! The heads are where most of the flavor is.

ADD THE REMAINING INGREDIENTS

Brown the ham and sausage with 1 tablespoon of butter.

Add the shrimp, garlic and Cajun spice, and saute without burning the spice (2 minutes).

Add the tomatoes and green onion, continuing to saute until the tomato renders some juice.

Moisten with the shrimp stock and bring to a bubble (not a boil), and finish with butter.


Shrimp and Grits with Chef Frank Lee

Over the years, shrimp and grits has gained widespread popularity across the country. A large reason for that growth is the continual creativity and culinary excellence cooked up from several chefs in South Carolina. Chef Frank Lee is a shining example of this, helping shrimp and grits' popularity soar nationwide.

Chef Lee has had a major influence on the culinary scene in South Carolina, starting in Charleston. Several of the chefs he has worked with and mentored over the years have gone on to run their own kitchens, from Charleston to Columbia to Greenville.

Chef Lee has also had a major influence on the menu at one of South Carolina's most iconic restaurants, Slightly North of Broad, or "SNOB," as the locals like to refer to it. Slightly North of Broad is part of Hall Management Group, which is an array of restaurants dedicated to sharing unique culinary experiences and Southern culture.

Chef Lee has always placed a large emphasis on local ingredients-from fresh produce to meat and seafood. This, paired with his French techniques learned while traveling and dining throughout Europe, has helped form Slightly North of Broad's famous shrimp and grits dish, the most popular item on an already mouthwatering menu.

SHRIMP AND GRITS (recipe courtesy of Frank Lee)

Shrimp Stock

Tools needed: 2-gallon pot, fine chinois

4 cups shrimp shells (2 pounds shrimp)

1 cup carrot, medium diced

1 cup fresh tomato, medium diced

Remaining Ingredients

4 ounces country ham, julienned

4 ounces kielbasa sausage

20 shrimp, peeled and deveined

1 cup fresh tomato, peeled, seeded and medium diced

MAKE THE GRITS

Bring water, salt and 1 tablespoon butter to a boil.

Stir in grits. Reduce heat to low and cook, covered, stirring occasionally until grits are thick and creamy.

After about 40 minutes, remove from heat and finish by stirring in cream and the remaining butter. Keep warm until ready to serve.

MAKE THE STOCK

Toast the shrimp shells in olive oil in the 2-gallon pot until pink and fragrant.

Add the onion, carrot, celery and fennel seed and cook without burning until the vegetables relax, giving up some of their rigidity.

Add the tomato and garlic and cook for 5 minutes.

Add the water, bring to a boil, skim and simmer for 30 minutes. Strain through a fine chinois.

If you can get local shrimp with the heads on, use them! The heads are where most of the flavor is.

ADD THE REMAINING INGREDIENTS

Brown the ham and sausage with 1 tablespoon of butter.

Add the shrimp, garlic and Cajun spice, and saute without burning the spice (2 minutes).

Add the tomatoes and green onion, continuing to saute until the tomato renders some juice.

Moisten with the shrimp stock and bring to a bubble (not a boil), and finish with butter.


Shrimp and Grits with Chef Frank Lee

Over the years, shrimp and grits has gained widespread popularity across the country. A large reason for that growth is the continual creativity and culinary excellence cooked up from several chefs in South Carolina. Chef Frank Lee is a shining example of this, helping shrimp and grits' popularity soar nationwide.

Chef Lee has had a major influence on the culinary scene in South Carolina, starting in Charleston. Several of the chefs he has worked with and mentored over the years have gone on to run their own kitchens, from Charleston to Columbia to Greenville.

Chef Lee has also had a major influence on the menu at one of South Carolina's most iconic restaurants, Slightly North of Broad, or "SNOB," as the locals like to refer to it. Slightly North of Broad is part of Hall Management Group, which is an array of restaurants dedicated to sharing unique culinary experiences and Southern culture.

Chef Lee has always placed a large emphasis on local ingredients-from fresh produce to meat and seafood. This, paired with his French techniques learned while traveling and dining throughout Europe, has helped form Slightly North of Broad's famous shrimp and grits dish, the most popular item on an already mouthwatering menu.

SHRIMP AND GRITS (recipe courtesy of Frank Lee)

Shrimp Stock

Tools needed: 2-gallon pot, fine chinois

4 cups shrimp shells (2 pounds shrimp)

1 cup carrot, medium diced

1 cup fresh tomato, medium diced

Remaining Ingredients

4 ounces country ham, julienned

4 ounces kielbasa sausage

20 shrimp, peeled and deveined

1 cup fresh tomato, peeled, seeded and medium diced

MAKE THE GRITS

Bring water, salt and 1 tablespoon butter to a boil.

Stir in grits. Reduce heat to low and cook, covered, stirring occasionally until grits are thick and creamy.

After about 40 minutes, remove from heat and finish by stirring in cream and the remaining butter. Keep warm until ready to serve.

MAKE THE STOCK

Toast the shrimp shells in olive oil in the 2-gallon pot until pink and fragrant.

Add the onion, carrot, celery and fennel seed and cook without burning until the vegetables relax, giving up some of their rigidity.

Add the tomato and garlic and cook for 5 minutes.

Add the water, bring to a boil, skim and simmer for 30 minutes. Strain through a fine chinois.

If you can get local shrimp with the heads on, use them! The heads are where most of the flavor is.

ADD THE REMAINING INGREDIENTS

Brown the ham and sausage with 1 tablespoon of butter.

Add the shrimp, garlic and Cajun spice, and saute without burning the spice (2 minutes).

Add the tomatoes and green onion, continuing to saute until the tomato renders some juice.

Moisten with the shrimp stock and bring to a bubble (not a boil), and finish with butter.


Shrimp and Grits with Chef Frank Lee

Over the years, shrimp and grits has gained widespread popularity across the country. A large reason for that growth is the continual creativity and culinary excellence cooked up from several chefs in South Carolina. Chef Frank Lee is a shining example of this, helping shrimp and grits' popularity soar nationwide.

Chef Lee has had a major influence on the culinary scene in South Carolina, starting in Charleston. Several of the chefs he has worked with and mentored over the years have gone on to run their own kitchens, from Charleston to Columbia to Greenville.

Chef Lee has also had a major influence on the menu at one of South Carolina's most iconic restaurants, Slightly North of Broad, or "SNOB," as the locals like to refer to it. Slightly North of Broad is part of Hall Management Group, which is an array of restaurants dedicated to sharing unique culinary experiences and Southern culture.

Chef Lee has always placed a large emphasis on local ingredients-from fresh produce to meat and seafood. This, paired with his French techniques learned while traveling and dining throughout Europe, has helped form Slightly North of Broad's famous shrimp and grits dish, the most popular item on an already mouthwatering menu.

SHRIMP AND GRITS (recipe courtesy of Frank Lee)

Shrimp Stock

Tools needed: 2-gallon pot, fine chinois

4 cups shrimp shells (2 pounds shrimp)

1 cup carrot, medium diced

1 cup fresh tomato, medium diced

Remaining Ingredients

4 ounces country ham, julienned

4 ounces kielbasa sausage

20 shrimp, peeled and deveined

1 cup fresh tomato, peeled, seeded and medium diced

MAKE THE GRITS

Bring water, salt and 1 tablespoon butter to a boil.

Stir in grits. Reduce heat to low and cook, covered, stirring occasionally until grits are thick and creamy.

After about 40 minutes, remove from heat and finish by stirring in cream and the remaining butter. Keep warm until ready to serve.

MAKE THE STOCK

Toast the shrimp shells in olive oil in the 2-gallon pot until pink and fragrant.

Add the onion, carrot, celery and fennel seed and cook without burning until the vegetables relax, giving up some of their rigidity.

Add the tomato and garlic and cook for 5 minutes.

Add the water, bring to a boil, skim and simmer for 30 minutes. Strain through a fine chinois.

If you can get local shrimp with the heads on, use them! The heads are where most of the flavor is.

ADD THE REMAINING INGREDIENTS

Brown the ham and sausage with 1 tablespoon of butter.

Add the shrimp, garlic and Cajun spice, and saute without burning the spice (2 minutes).

Add the tomatoes and green onion, continuing to saute until the tomato renders some juice.

Moisten with the shrimp stock and bring to a bubble (not a boil), and finish with butter.


Shrimp and Grits with Chef Frank Lee

Over the years, shrimp and grits has gained widespread popularity across the country. A large reason for that growth is the continual creativity and culinary excellence cooked up from several chefs in South Carolina. Chef Frank Lee is a shining example of this, helping shrimp and grits' popularity soar nationwide.

Chef Lee has had a major influence on the culinary scene in South Carolina, starting in Charleston. Several of the chefs he has worked with and mentored over the years have gone on to run their own kitchens, from Charleston to Columbia to Greenville.

Chef Lee has also had a major influence on the menu at one of South Carolina's most iconic restaurants, Slightly North of Broad, or "SNOB," as the locals like to refer to it. Slightly North of Broad is part of Hall Management Group, which is an array of restaurants dedicated to sharing unique culinary experiences and Southern culture.

Chef Lee has always placed a large emphasis on local ingredients-from fresh produce to meat and seafood. This, paired with his French techniques learned while traveling and dining throughout Europe, has helped form Slightly North of Broad's famous shrimp and grits dish, the most popular item on an already mouthwatering menu.

SHRIMP AND GRITS (recipe courtesy of Frank Lee)

Shrimp Stock

Tools needed: 2-gallon pot, fine chinois

4 cups shrimp shells (2 pounds shrimp)

1 cup carrot, medium diced

1 cup fresh tomato, medium diced

Remaining Ingredients

4 ounces country ham, julienned

4 ounces kielbasa sausage

20 shrimp, peeled and deveined

1 cup fresh tomato, peeled, seeded and medium diced

MAKE THE GRITS

Bring water, salt and 1 tablespoon butter to a boil.

Stir in grits. Reduce heat to low and cook, covered, stirring occasionally until grits are thick and creamy.

After about 40 minutes, remove from heat and finish by stirring in cream and the remaining butter. Keep warm until ready to serve.

MAKE THE STOCK

Toast the shrimp shells in olive oil in the 2-gallon pot until pink and fragrant.

Add the onion, carrot, celery and fennel seed and cook without burning until the vegetables relax, giving up some of their rigidity.

Add the tomato and garlic and cook for 5 minutes.

Add the water, bring to a boil, skim and simmer for 30 minutes. Strain through a fine chinois.

If you can get local shrimp with the heads on, use them! The heads are where most of the flavor is.

ADD THE REMAINING INGREDIENTS

Brown the ham and sausage with 1 tablespoon of butter.

Add the shrimp, garlic and Cajun spice, and saute without burning the spice (2 minutes).

Add the tomatoes and green onion, continuing to saute until the tomato renders some juice.

Moisten with the shrimp stock and bring to a bubble (not a boil), and finish with butter.


Shrimp and Grits with Chef Frank Lee

Over the years, shrimp and grits has gained widespread popularity across the country. A large reason for that growth is the continual creativity and culinary excellence cooked up from several chefs in South Carolina. Chef Frank Lee is a shining example of this, helping shrimp and grits' popularity soar nationwide.

Chef Lee has had a major influence on the culinary scene in South Carolina, starting in Charleston. Several of the chefs he has worked with and mentored over the years have gone on to run their own kitchens, from Charleston to Columbia to Greenville.

Chef Lee has also had a major influence on the menu at one of South Carolina's most iconic restaurants, Slightly North of Broad, or "SNOB," as the locals like to refer to it. Slightly North of Broad is part of Hall Management Group, which is an array of restaurants dedicated to sharing unique culinary experiences and Southern culture.

Chef Lee has always placed a large emphasis on local ingredients-from fresh produce to meat and seafood. This, paired with his French techniques learned while traveling and dining throughout Europe, has helped form Slightly North of Broad's famous shrimp and grits dish, the most popular item on an already mouthwatering menu.

SHRIMP AND GRITS (recipe courtesy of Frank Lee)

Shrimp Stock

Tools needed: 2-gallon pot, fine chinois

4 cups shrimp shells (2 pounds shrimp)

1 cup carrot, medium diced

1 cup fresh tomato, medium diced

Remaining Ingredients

4 ounces country ham, julienned

4 ounces kielbasa sausage

20 shrimp, peeled and deveined

1 cup fresh tomato, peeled, seeded and medium diced

MAKE THE GRITS

Bring water, salt and 1 tablespoon butter to a boil.

Stir in grits. Reduce heat to low and cook, covered, stirring occasionally until grits are thick and creamy.

After about 40 minutes, remove from heat and finish by stirring in cream and the remaining butter. Keep warm until ready to serve.

MAKE THE STOCK

Toast the shrimp shells in olive oil in the 2-gallon pot until pink and fragrant.

Add the onion, carrot, celery and fennel seed and cook without burning until the vegetables relax, giving up some of their rigidity.

Add the tomato and garlic and cook for 5 minutes.

Add the water, bring to a boil, skim and simmer for 30 minutes. Strain through a fine chinois.

If you can get local shrimp with the heads on, use them! The heads are where most of the flavor is.

ADD THE REMAINING INGREDIENTS

Brown the ham and sausage with 1 tablespoon of butter.

Add the shrimp, garlic and Cajun spice, and saute without burning the spice (2 minutes).

Add the tomatoes and green onion, continuing to saute until the tomato renders some juice.

Moisten with the shrimp stock and bring to a bubble (not a boil), and finish with butter.


Shrimp and Grits with Chef Frank Lee

Over the years, shrimp and grits has gained widespread popularity across the country. A large reason for that growth is the continual creativity and culinary excellence cooked up from several chefs in South Carolina. Chef Frank Lee is a shining example of this, helping shrimp and grits' popularity soar nationwide.

Chef Lee has had a major influence on the culinary scene in South Carolina, starting in Charleston. Several of the chefs he has worked with and mentored over the years have gone on to run their own kitchens, from Charleston to Columbia to Greenville.

Chef Lee has also had a major influence on the menu at one of South Carolina's most iconic restaurants, Slightly North of Broad, or "SNOB," as the locals like to refer to it. Slightly North of Broad is part of Hall Management Group, which is an array of restaurants dedicated to sharing unique culinary experiences and Southern culture.

Chef Lee has always placed a large emphasis on local ingredients-from fresh produce to meat and seafood. This, paired with his French techniques learned while traveling and dining throughout Europe, has helped form Slightly North of Broad's famous shrimp and grits dish, the most popular item on an already mouthwatering menu.

SHRIMP AND GRITS (recipe courtesy of Frank Lee)

Shrimp Stock

Tools needed: 2-gallon pot, fine chinois

4 cups shrimp shells (2 pounds shrimp)

1 cup carrot, medium diced

1 cup fresh tomato, medium diced

Remaining Ingredients

4 ounces country ham, julienned

4 ounces kielbasa sausage

20 shrimp, peeled and deveined

1 cup fresh tomato, peeled, seeded and medium diced

MAKE THE GRITS

Bring water, salt and 1 tablespoon butter to a boil.

Stir in grits. Reduce heat to low and cook, covered, stirring occasionally until grits are thick and creamy.

After about 40 minutes, remove from heat and finish by stirring in cream and the remaining butter. Keep warm until ready to serve.

MAKE THE STOCK

Toast the shrimp shells in olive oil in the 2-gallon pot until pink and fragrant.

Add the onion, carrot, celery and fennel seed and cook without burning until the vegetables relax, giving up some of their rigidity.

Add the tomato and garlic and cook for 5 minutes.

Add the water, bring to a boil, skim and simmer for 30 minutes. Strain through a fine chinois.

If you can get local shrimp with the heads on, use them! The heads are where most of the flavor is.

ADD THE REMAINING INGREDIENTS

Brown the ham and sausage with 1 tablespoon of butter.

Add the shrimp, garlic and Cajun spice, and saute without burning the spice (2 minutes).

Add the tomatoes and green onion, continuing to saute until the tomato renders some juice.

Moisten with the shrimp stock and bring to a bubble (not a boil), and finish with butter.


Shrimp and Grits with Chef Frank Lee

Over the years, shrimp and grits has gained widespread popularity across the country. A large reason for that growth is the continual creativity and culinary excellence cooked up from several chefs in South Carolina. Chef Frank Lee is a shining example of this, helping shrimp and grits' popularity soar nationwide.

Chef Lee has had a major influence on the culinary scene in South Carolina, starting in Charleston. Several of the chefs he has worked with and mentored over the years have gone on to run their own kitchens, from Charleston to Columbia to Greenville.

Chef Lee has also had a major influence on the menu at one of South Carolina's most iconic restaurants, Slightly North of Broad, or "SNOB," as the locals like to refer to it. Slightly North of Broad is part of Hall Management Group, which is an array of restaurants dedicated to sharing unique culinary experiences and Southern culture.

Chef Lee has always placed a large emphasis on local ingredients-from fresh produce to meat and seafood. This, paired with his French techniques learned while traveling and dining throughout Europe, has helped form Slightly North of Broad's famous shrimp and grits dish, the most popular item on an already mouthwatering menu.

SHRIMP AND GRITS (recipe courtesy of Frank Lee)

Shrimp Stock

Tools needed: 2-gallon pot, fine chinois

4 cups shrimp shells (2 pounds shrimp)

1 cup carrot, medium diced

1 cup fresh tomato, medium diced

Remaining Ingredients

4 ounces country ham, julienned

4 ounces kielbasa sausage

20 shrimp, peeled and deveined

1 cup fresh tomato, peeled, seeded and medium diced

MAKE THE GRITS

Bring water, salt and 1 tablespoon butter to a boil.

Stir in grits. Reduce heat to low and cook, covered, stirring occasionally until grits are thick and creamy.

After about 40 minutes, remove from heat and finish by stirring in cream and the remaining butter. Keep warm until ready to serve.

MAKE THE STOCK

Toast the shrimp shells in olive oil in the 2-gallon pot until pink and fragrant.

Add the onion, carrot, celery and fennel seed and cook without burning until the vegetables relax, giving up some of their rigidity.

Add the tomato and garlic and cook for 5 minutes.

Add the water, bring to a boil, skim and simmer for 30 minutes. Strain through a fine chinois.

If you can get local shrimp with the heads on, use them! The heads are where most of the flavor is.

ADD THE REMAINING INGREDIENTS

Brown the ham and sausage with 1 tablespoon of butter.

Add the shrimp, garlic and Cajun spice, and saute without burning the spice (2 minutes).

Add the tomatoes and green onion, continuing to saute until the tomato renders some juice.

Moisten with the shrimp stock and bring to a bubble (not a boil), and finish with butter.


Watch the video: SAILING CHRISTOPHER CROSS Cover by HSCC