New recipes

25 Food Labels That Have You Fooled

25 Food Labels That Have You Fooled


So you never again fall for that bag of potato chips labeled ‘gluten-free’

Are those flashy claims really backed up by the nutrition facts, or are they total lies?

These days, products are trying to outperform each other from any and all angles. The simple task of choosing a breakfast cereal has become marred with a swarm of advertisements and flashy claims about health on the front of products’ boxes. Are those chocolate-stuffed squares really a good source of fiber? Are those rice crisps that turn your milk a creamy cocoa really made of healthy whole grains?

Click here for the 25 Food Labels That Have You Fooled Slideshow.

Often, these labels are there to fool you into thinking that a product is the healthier choice when in actuality, there’s not much that’s healthy about it. Marketers are smart. They use buzzwords and promises they know you’re looking for and find loopholes in federal regulations to make things sound better than they actually are.

The best way to ensure you’re buying a healthy product is to check the nutrition facts and the ingredients — both of which provide valuable information about your health, if you know how to read them right. But sometimes, you don’t have the time or energy to scour over the numbers and fine print.

We’re here to help you decode those attention-grabbing declarations and crack the code of product marketing. It can become much easier to see through all that misleading information once you know which labels have you fooled.


Are you being fooled by food labels?

What's behind food labeling? Why does the two-calorie cola claim that it's calorie-free? How come that low fat dressing still has three grams of fat?

According to the guidelines for food labels, in order for a food to be labeled 'calorie free' it must have less than five calories per serving. 'Low fat' choices need to have three grams of fat or less per serving. Here are some more guidelines to help you better understand the claims on food labels.

Low calorie: 40 calories or less per serving

Fat free: Less than 0.5g fat of saturated fat per serving

Saturated fat free: Less than 0.5g of saturated fat and less than 0.5g of trans fatty acids
per serving

Low saturated fat:
1g or less saturated fat per serving

Sodium free (or salt free): Less than 5mg sodium per serving

Very low sodium: 35mg of sodium or less per serving

Low sodium: 140mg of sodium or less per serving

Reduced sodium: At least 25 per cent less sodium per serving than the regular version

Cholesterol free: Less than 2mg cholesterol per serving

Low cholesterol: 20mg or less cholesterol per serving

Reduced cholesterol: At least 25 per cent less cholesterol per serving than the regular version

Sugar free: Less than 500mg of sugar per serving

Reduced sugar: At least 25 per cent less sugar per serving than the regular version

High fiber: 5g or more fiber per serving

Good source of fiber:
2.5-4.9g of fiber per serving

Remember to look beyond the claims when you're selecting groceries. A product that is labeled fat free may still be loaded with high fructose corn syrup to enhance taste.

Always check the nutrition facts label to find out the amounts of fat, cholesterol, sodium, carbohydrates, and more. Here are some of the items listed that you&rsquoll want to pay close attention to.

Serving size
The serving size is listed at the top of the label. While a food item may appear low in fat or calories, you might notice that the serving size is tiny. Keep this in mind when measuring portions.

Calories (kcal)
Calories provide a measurement of how much energy you obtain after eating a serving size of a specific food.

Nutrients
The nutrients listed on a food label refer to total fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, carbohydrates (including fiber and added sugars), protein, vitamin A, C, calcium and iron. Other nutrients may be included if the manufacturer decides to do so.

Percent daily values
These listings provide an estimate of the percentage of a nutrient from one serving in typical 2000-calorie diet.

&bull If a food provides 5 per cent or less of a nutrient, it&rsquos considered a poor source of that nutrient.

&bull Foods that provide 10-20 per cent of your daily-recommended amount of a nutrient are a good source of that nutrient.

&bull If a food provides more than 20 percent, it&rsquos considered high in that nutrient.

Ingredient list
The ingredient list is always ordered from most prominent ingredient to the least. In other words, if the first item on the ingredient list is sugar, the food contains more sugar than any other ingredient. Beware of foods that list sugar (including high fructose corn syrup or sucrose), fats, oils or salt as one of their first two ingredients. These are not your healthiest choices.


Are you being fooled by food labels?

What's behind food labeling? Why does the two-calorie cola claim that it's calorie-free? How come that low fat dressing still has three grams of fat?

According to the guidelines for food labels, in order for a food to be labeled 'calorie free' it must have less than five calories per serving. 'Low fat' choices need to have three grams of fat or less per serving. Here are some more guidelines to help you better understand the claims on food labels.

Low calorie: 40 calories or less per serving

Fat free: Less than 0.5g fat of saturated fat per serving

Saturated fat free: Less than 0.5g of saturated fat and less than 0.5g of trans fatty acids
per serving

Low saturated fat:
1g or less saturated fat per serving

Sodium free (or salt free): Less than 5mg sodium per serving

Very low sodium: 35mg of sodium or less per serving

Low sodium: 140mg of sodium or less per serving

Reduced sodium: At least 25 per cent less sodium per serving than the regular version

Cholesterol free: Less than 2mg cholesterol per serving

Low cholesterol: 20mg or less cholesterol per serving

Reduced cholesterol: At least 25 per cent less cholesterol per serving than the regular version

Sugar free: Less than 500mg of sugar per serving

Reduced sugar: At least 25 per cent less sugar per serving than the regular version

High fiber: 5g or more fiber per serving

Good source of fiber:
2.5-4.9g of fiber per serving

Remember to look beyond the claims when you're selecting groceries. A product that is labeled fat free may still be loaded with high fructose corn syrup to enhance taste.

Always check the nutrition facts label to find out the amounts of fat, cholesterol, sodium, carbohydrates, and more. Here are some of the items listed that you&rsquoll want to pay close attention to.

Serving size
The serving size is listed at the top of the label. While a food item may appear low in fat or calories, you might notice that the serving size is tiny. Keep this in mind when measuring portions.

Calories (kcal)
Calories provide a measurement of how much energy you obtain after eating a serving size of a specific food.

Nutrients
The nutrients listed on a food label refer to total fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, carbohydrates (including fiber and added sugars), protein, vitamin A, C, calcium and iron. Other nutrients may be included if the manufacturer decides to do so.

Percent daily values
These listings provide an estimate of the percentage of a nutrient from one serving in typical 2000-calorie diet.

&bull If a food provides 5 per cent or less of a nutrient, it&rsquos considered a poor source of that nutrient.

&bull Foods that provide 10-20 per cent of your daily-recommended amount of a nutrient are a good source of that nutrient.

&bull If a food provides more than 20 percent, it&rsquos considered high in that nutrient.

Ingredient list
The ingredient list is always ordered from most prominent ingredient to the least. In other words, if the first item on the ingredient list is sugar, the food contains more sugar than any other ingredient. Beware of foods that list sugar (including high fructose corn syrup or sucrose), fats, oils or salt as one of their first two ingredients. These are not your healthiest choices.


Are you being fooled by food labels?

What's behind food labeling? Why does the two-calorie cola claim that it's calorie-free? How come that low fat dressing still has three grams of fat?

According to the guidelines for food labels, in order for a food to be labeled 'calorie free' it must have less than five calories per serving. 'Low fat' choices need to have three grams of fat or less per serving. Here are some more guidelines to help you better understand the claims on food labels.

Low calorie: 40 calories or less per serving

Fat free: Less than 0.5g fat of saturated fat per serving

Saturated fat free: Less than 0.5g of saturated fat and less than 0.5g of trans fatty acids
per serving

Low saturated fat:
1g or less saturated fat per serving

Sodium free (or salt free): Less than 5mg sodium per serving

Very low sodium: 35mg of sodium or less per serving

Low sodium: 140mg of sodium or less per serving

Reduced sodium: At least 25 per cent less sodium per serving than the regular version

Cholesterol free: Less than 2mg cholesterol per serving

Low cholesterol: 20mg or less cholesterol per serving

Reduced cholesterol: At least 25 per cent less cholesterol per serving than the regular version

Sugar free: Less than 500mg of sugar per serving

Reduced sugar: At least 25 per cent less sugar per serving than the regular version

High fiber: 5g or more fiber per serving

Good source of fiber:
2.5-4.9g of fiber per serving

Remember to look beyond the claims when you're selecting groceries. A product that is labeled fat free may still be loaded with high fructose corn syrup to enhance taste.

Always check the nutrition facts label to find out the amounts of fat, cholesterol, sodium, carbohydrates, and more. Here are some of the items listed that you&rsquoll want to pay close attention to.

Serving size
The serving size is listed at the top of the label. While a food item may appear low in fat or calories, you might notice that the serving size is tiny. Keep this in mind when measuring portions.

Calories (kcal)
Calories provide a measurement of how much energy you obtain after eating a serving size of a specific food.

Nutrients
The nutrients listed on a food label refer to total fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, carbohydrates (including fiber and added sugars), protein, vitamin A, C, calcium and iron. Other nutrients may be included if the manufacturer decides to do so.

Percent daily values
These listings provide an estimate of the percentage of a nutrient from one serving in typical 2000-calorie diet.

&bull If a food provides 5 per cent or less of a nutrient, it&rsquos considered a poor source of that nutrient.

&bull Foods that provide 10-20 per cent of your daily-recommended amount of a nutrient are a good source of that nutrient.

&bull If a food provides more than 20 percent, it&rsquos considered high in that nutrient.

Ingredient list
The ingredient list is always ordered from most prominent ingredient to the least. In other words, if the first item on the ingredient list is sugar, the food contains more sugar than any other ingredient. Beware of foods that list sugar (including high fructose corn syrup or sucrose), fats, oils or salt as one of their first two ingredients. These are not your healthiest choices.


Are you being fooled by food labels?

What's behind food labeling? Why does the two-calorie cola claim that it's calorie-free? How come that low fat dressing still has three grams of fat?

According to the guidelines for food labels, in order for a food to be labeled 'calorie free' it must have less than five calories per serving. 'Low fat' choices need to have three grams of fat or less per serving. Here are some more guidelines to help you better understand the claims on food labels.

Low calorie: 40 calories or less per serving

Fat free: Less than 0.5g fat of saturated fat per serving

Saturated fat free: Less than 0.5g of saturated fat and less than 0.5g of trans fatty acids
per serving

Low saturated fat:
1g or less saturated fat per serving

Sodium free (or salt free): Less than 5mg sodium per serving

Very low sodium: 35mg of sodium or less per serving

Low sodium: 140mg of sodium or less per serving

Reduced sodium: At least 25 per cent less sodium per serving than the regular version

Cholesterol free: Less than 2mg cholesterol per serving

Low cholesterol: 20mg or less cholesterol per serving

Reduced cholesterol: At least 25 per cent less cholesterol per serving than the regular version

Sugar free: Less than 500mg of sugar per serving

Reduced sugar: At least 25 per cent less sugar per serving than the regular version

High fiber: 5g or more fiber per serving

Good source of fiber:
2.5-4.9g of fiber per serving

Remember to look beyond the claims when you're selecting groceries. A product that is labeled fat free may still be loaded with high fructose corn syrup to enhance taste.

Always check the nutrition facts label to find out the amounts of fat, cholesterol, sodium, carbohydrates, and more. Here are some of the items listed that you&rsquoll want to pay close attention to.

Serving size
The serving size is listed at the top of the label. While a food item may appear low in fat or calories, you might notice that the serving size is tiny. Keep this in mind when measuring portions.

Calories (kcal)
Calories provide a measurement of how much energy you obtain after eating a serving size of a specific food.

Nutrients
The nutrients listed on a food label refer to total fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, carbohydrates (including fiber and added sugars), protein, vitamin A, C, calcium and iron. Other nutrients may be included if the manufacturer decides to do so.

Percent daily values
These listings provide an estimate of the percentage of a nutrient from one serving in typical 2000-calorie diet.

&bull If a food provides 5 per cent or less of a nutrient, it&rsquos considered a poor source of that nutrient.

&bull Foods that provide 10-20 per cent of your daily-recommended amount of a nutrient are a good source of that nutrient.

&bull If a food provides more than 20 percent, it&rsquos considered high in that nutrient.

Ingredient list
The ingredient list is always ordered from most prominent ingredient to the least. In other words, if the first item on the ingredient list is sugar, the food contains more sugar than any other ingredient. Beware of foods that list sugar (including high fructose corn syrup or sucrose), fats, oils or salt as one of their first two ingredients. These are not your healthiest choices.


Are you being fooled by food labels?

What's behind food labeling? Why does the two-calorie cola claim that it's calorie-free? How come that low fat dressing still has three grams of fat?

According to the guidelines for food labels, in order for a food to be labeled 'calorie free' it must have less than five calories per serving. 'Low fat' choices need to have three grams of fat or less per serving. Here are some more guidelines to help you better understand the claims on food labels.

Low calorie: 40 calories or less per serving

Fat free: Less than 0.5g fat of saturated fat per serving

Saturated fat free: Less than 0.5g of saturated fat and less than 0.5g of trans fatty acids
per serving

Low saturated fat:
1g or less saturated fat per serving

Sodium free (or salt free): Less than 5mg sodium per serving

Very low sodium: 35mg of sodium or less per serving

Low sodium: 140mg of sodium or less per serving

Reduced sodium: At least 25 per cent less sodium per serving than the regular version

Cholesterol free: Less than 2mg cholesterol per serving

Low cholesterol: 20mg or less cholesterol per serving

Reduced cholesterol: At least 25 per cent less cholesterol per serving than the regular version

Sugar free: Less than 500mg of sugar per serving

Reduced sugar: At least 25 per cent less sugar per serving than the regular version

High fiber: 5g or more fiber per serving

Good source of fiber:
2.5-4.9g of fiber per serving

Remember to look beyond the claims when you're selecting groceries. A product that is labeled fat free may still be loaded with high fructose corn syrup to enhance taste.

Always check the nutrition facts label to find out the amounts of fat, cholesterol, sodium, carbohydrates, and more. Here are some of the items listed that you&rsquoll want to pay close attention to.

Serving size
The serving size is listed at the top of the label. While a food item may appear low in fat or calories, you might notice that the serving size is tiny. Keep this in mind when measuring portions.

Calories (kcal)
Calories provide a measurement of how much energy you obtain after eating a serving size of a specific food.

Nutrients
The nutrients listed on a food label refer to total fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, carbohydrates (including fiber and added sugars), protein, vitamin A, C, calcium and iron. Other nutrients may be included if the manufacturer decides to do so.

Percent daily values
These listings provide an estimate of the percentage of a nutrient from one serving in typical 2000-calorie diet.

&bull If a food provides 5 per cent or less of a nutrient, it&rsquos considered a poor source of that nutrient.

&bull Foods that provide 10-20 per cent of your daily-recommended amount of a nutrient are a good source of that nutrient.

&bull If a food provides more than 20 percent, it&rsquos considered high in that nutrient.

Ingredient list
The ingredient list is always ordered from most prominent ingredient to the least. In other words, if the first item on the ingredient list is sugar, the food contains more sugar than any other ingredient. Beware of foods that list sugar (including high fructose corn syrup or sucrose), fats, oils or salt as one of their first two ingredients. These are not your healthiest choices.


Are you being fooled by food labels?

What's behind food labeling? Why does the two-calorie cola claim that it's calorie-free? How come that low fat dressing still has three grams of fat?

According to the guidelines for food labels, in order for a food to be labeled 'calorie free' it must have less than five calories per serving. 'Low fat' choices need to have three grams of fat or less per serving. Here are some more guidelines to help you better understand the claims on food labels.

Low calorie: 40 calories or less per serving

Fat free: Less than 0.5g fat of saturated fat per serving

Saturated fat free: Less than 0.5g of saturated fat and less than 0.5g of trans fatty acids
per serving

Low saturated fat:
1g or less saturated fat per serving

Sodium free (or salt free): Less than 5mg sodium per serving

Very low sodium: 35mg of sodium or less per serving

Low sodium: 140mg of sodium or less per serving

Reduced sodium: At least 25 per cent less sodium per serving than the regular version

Cholesterol free: Less than 2mg cholesterol per serving

Low cholesterol: 20mg or less cholesterol per serving

Reduced cholesterol: At least 25 per cent less cholesterol per serving than the regular version

Sugar free: Less than 500mg of sugar per serving

Reduced sugar: At least 25 per cent less sugar per serving than the regular version

High fiber: 5g or more fiber per serving

Good source of fiber:
2.5-4.9g of fiber per serving

Remember to look beyond the claims when you're selecting groceries. A product that is labeled fat free may still be loaded with high fructose corn syrup to enhance taste.

Always check the nutrition facts label to find out the amounts of fat, cholesterol, sodium, carbohydrates, and more. Here are some of the items listed that you&rsquoll want to pay close attention to.

Serving size
The serving size is listed at the top of the label. While a food item may appear low in fat or calories, you might notice that the serving size is tiny. Keep this in mind when measuring portions.

Calories (kcal)
Calories provide a measurement of how much energy you obtain after eating a serving size of a specific food.

Nutrients
The nutrients listed on a food label refer to total fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, carbohydrates (including fiber and added sugars), protein, vitamin A, C, calcium and iron. Other nutrients may be included if the manufacturer decides to do so.

Percent daily values
These listings provide an estimate of the percentage of a nutrient from one serving in typical 2000-calorie diet.

&bull If a food provides 5 per cent or less of a nutrient, it&rsquos considered a poor source of that nutrient.

&bull Foods that provide 10-20 per cent of your daily-recommended amount of a nutrient are a good source of that nutrient.

&bull If a food provides more than 20 percent, it&rsquos considered high in that nutrient.

Ingredient list
The ingredient list is always ordered from most prominent ingredient to the least. In other words, if the first item on the ingredient list is sugar, the food contains more sugar than any other ingredient. Beware of foods that list sugar (including high fructose corn syrup or sucrose), fats, oils or salt as one of their first two ingredients. These are not your healthiest choices.


Are you being fooled by food labels?

What's behind food labeling? Why does the two-calorie cola claim that it's calorie-free? How come that low fat dressing still has three grams of fat?

According to the guidelines for food labels, in order for a food to be labeled 'calorie free' it must have less than five calories per serving. 'Low fat' choices need to have three grams of fat or less per serving. Here are some more guidelines to help you better understand the claims on food labels.

Low calorie: 40 calories or less per serving

Fat free: Less than 0.5g fat of saturated fat per serving

Saturated fat free: Less than 0.5g of saturated fat and less than 0.5g of trans fatty acids
per serving

Low saturated fat:
1g or less saturated fat per serving

Sodium free (or salt free): Less than 5mg sodium per serving

Very low sodium: 35mg of sodium or less per serving

Low sodium: 140mg of sodium or less per serving

Reduced sodium: At least 25 per cent less sodium per serving than the regular version

Cholesterol free: Less than 2mg cholesterol per serving

Low cholesterol: 20mg or less cholesterol per serving

Reduced cholesterol: At least 25 per cent less cholesterol per serving than the regular version

Sugar free: Less than 500mg of sugar per serving

Reduced sugar: At least 25 per cent less sugar per serving than the regular version

High fiber: 5g or more fiber per serving

Good source of fiber:
2.5-4.9g of fiber per serving

Remember to look beyond the claims when you're selecting groceries. A product that is labeled fat free may still be loaded with high fructose corn syrup to enhance taste.

Always check the nutrition facts label to find out the amounts of fat, cholesterol, sodium, carbohydrates, and more. Here are some of the items listed that you&rsquoll want to pay close attention to.

Serving size
The serving size is listed at the top of the label. While a food item may appear low in fat or calories, you might notice that the serving size is tiny. Keep this in mind when measuring portions.

Calories (kcal)
Calories provide a measurement of how much energy you obtain after eating a serving size of a specific food.

Nutrients
The nutrients listed on a food label refer to total fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, carbohydrates (including fiber and added sugars), protein, vitamin A, C, calcium and iron. Other nutrients may be included if the manufacturer decides to do so.

Percent daily values
These listings provide an estimate of the percentage of a nutrient from one serving in typical 2000-calorie diet.

&bull If a food provides 5 per cent or less of a nutrient, it&rsquos considered a poor source of that nutrient.

&bull Foods that provide 10-20 per cent of your daily-recommended amount of a nutrient are a good source of that nutrient.

&bull If a food provides more than 20 percent, it&rsquos considered high in that nutrient.

Ingredient list
The ingredient list is always ordered from most prominent ingredient to the least. In other words, if the first item on the ingredient list is sugar, the food contains more sugar than any other ingredient. Beware of foods that list sugar (including high fructose corn syrup or sucrose), fats, oils or salt as one of their first two ingredients. These are not your healthiest choices.


Are you being fooled by food labels?

What's behind food labeling? Why does the two-calorie cola claim that it's calorie-free? How come that low fat dressing still has three grams of fat?

According to the guidelines for food labels, in order for a food to be labeled 'calorie free' it must have less than five calories per serving. 'Low fat' choices need to have three grams of fat or less per serving. Here are some more guidelines to help you better understand the claims on food labels.

Low calorie: 40 calories or less per serving

Fat free: Less than 0.5g fat of saturated fat per serving

Saturated fat free: Less than 0.5g of saturated fat and less than 0.5g of trans fatty acids
per serving

Low saturated fat:
1g or less saturated fat per serving

Sodium free (or salt free): Less than 5mg sodium per serving

Very low sodium: 35mg of sodium or less per serving

Low sodium: 140mg of sodium or less per serving

Reduced sodium: At least 25 per cent less sodium per serving than the regular version

Cholesterol free: Less than 2mg cholesterol per serving

Low cholesterol: 20mg or less cholesterol per serving

Reduced cholesterol: At least 25 per cent less cholesterol per serving than the regular version

Sugar free: Less than 500mg of sugar per serving

Reduced sugar: At least 25 per cent less sugar per serving than the regular version

High fiber: 5g or more fiber per serving

Good source of fiber:
2.5-4.9g of fiber per serving

Remember to look beyond the claims when you're selecting groceries. A product that is labeled fat free may still be loaded with high fructose corn syrup to enhance taste.

Always check the nutrition facts label to find out the amounts of fat, cholesterol, sodium, carbohydrates, and more. Here are some of the items listed that you&rsquoll want to pay close attention to.

Serving size
The serving size is listed at the top of the label. While a food item may appear low in fat or calories, you might notice that the serving size is tiny. Keep this in mind when measuring portions.

Calories (kcal)
Calories provide a measurement of how much energy you obtain after eating a serving size of a specific food.

Nutrients
The nutrients listed on a food label refer to total fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, carbohydrates (including fiber and added sugars), protein, vitamin A, C, calcium and iron. Other nutrients may be included if the manufacturer decides to do so.

Percent daily values
These listings provide an estimate of the percentage of a nutrient from one serving in typical 2000-calorie diet.

&bull If a food provides 5 per cent or less of a nutrient, it&rsquos considered a poor source of that nutrient.

&bull Foods that provide 10-20 per cent of your daily-recommended amount of a nutrient are a good source of that nutrient.

&bull If a food provides more than 20 percent, it&rsquos considered high in that nutrient.

Ingredient list
The ingredient list is always ordered from most prominent ingredient to the least. In other words, if the first item on the ingredient list is sugar, the food contains more sugar than any other ingredient. Beware of foods that list sugar (including high fructose corn syrup or sucrose), fats, oils or salt as one of their first two ingredients. These are not your healthiest choices.


Are you being fooled by food labels?

What's behind food labeling? Why does the two-calorie cola claim that it's calorie-free? How come that low fat dressing still has three grams of fat?

According to the guidelines for food labels, in order for a food to be labeled 'calorie free' it must have less than five calories per serving. 'Low fat' choices need to have three grams of fat or less per serving. Here are some more guidelines to help you better understand the claims on food labels.

Low calorie: 40 calories or less per serving

Fat free: Less than 0.5g fat of saturated fat per serving

Saturated fat free: Less than 0.5g of saturated fat and less than 0.5g of trans fatty acids
per serving

Low saturated fat:
1g or less saturated fat per serving

Sodium free (or salt free): Less than 5mg sodium per serving

Very low sodium: 35mg of sodium or less per serving

Low sodium: 140mg of sodium or less per serving

Reduced sodium: At least 25 per cent less sodium per serving than the regular version

Cholesterol free: Less than 2mg cholesterol per serving

Low cholesterol: 20mg or less cholesterol per serving

Reduced cholesterol: At least 25 per cent less cholesterol per serving than the regular version

Sugar free: Less than 500mg of sugar per serving

Reduced sugar: At least 25 per cent less sugar per serving than the regular version

High fiber: 5g or more fiber per serving

Good source of fiber:
2.5-4.9g of fiber per serving

Remember to look beyond the claims when you're selecting groceries. A product that is labeled fat free may still be loaded with high fructose corn syrup to enhance taste.

Always check the nutrition facts label to find out the amounts of fat, cholesterol, sodium, carbohydrates, and more. Here are some of the items listed that you&rsquoll want to pay close attention to.

Serving size
The serving size is listed at the top of the label. While a food item may appear low in fat or calories, you might notice that the serving size is tiny. Keep this in mind when measuring portions.

Calories (kcal)
Calories provide a measurement of how much energy you obtain after eating a serving size of a specific food.

Nutrients
The nutrients listed on a food label refer to total fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, carbohydrates (including fiber and added sugars), protein, vitamin A, C, calcium and iron. Other nutrients may be included if the manufacturer decides to do so.

Percent daily values
These listings provide an estimate of the percentage of a nutrient from one serving in typical 2000-calorie diet.

&bull If a food provides 5 per cent or less of a nutrient, it&rsquos considered a poor source of that nutrient.

&bull Foods that provide 10-20 per cent of your daily-recommended amount of a nutrient are a good source of that nutrient.

&bull If a food provides more than 20 percent, it&rsquos considered high in that nutrient.

Ingredient list
The ingredient list is always ordered from most prominent ingredient to the least. In other words, if the first item on the ingredient list is sugar, the food contains more sugar than any other ingredient. Beware of foods that list sugar (including high fructose corn syrup or sucrose), fats, oils or salt as one of their first two ingredients. These are not your healthiest choices.


Are you being fooled by food labels?

What's behind food labeling? Why does the two-calorie cola claim that it's calorie-free? How come that low fat dressing still has three grams of fat?

According to the guidelines for food labels, in order for a food to be labeled 'calorie free' it must have less than five calories per serving. 'Low fat' choices need to have three grams of fat or less per serving. Here are some more guidelines to help you better understand the claims on food labels.

Low calorie: 40 calories or less per serving

Fat free: Less than 0.5g fat of saturated fat per serving

Saturated fat free: Less than 0.5g of saturated fat and less than 0.5g of trans fatty acids
per serving

Low saturated fat:
1g or less saturated fat per serving

Sodium free (or salt free): Less than 5mg sodium per serving

Very low sodium: 35mg of sodium or less per serving

Low sodium: 140mg of sodium or less per serving

Reduced sodium: At least 25 per cent less sodium per serving than the regular version

Cholesterol free: Less than 2mg cholesterol per serving

Low cholesterol: 20mg or less cholesterol per serving

Reduced cholesterol: At least 25 per cent less cholesterol per serving than the regular version

Sugar free: Less than 500mg of sugar per serving

Reduced sugar: At least 25 per cent less sugar per serving than the regular version

High fiber: 5g or more fiber per serving

Good source of fiber:
2.5-4.9g of fiber per serving

Remember to look beyond the claims when you're selecting groceries. A product that is labeled fat free may still be loaded with high fructose corn syrup to enhance taste.

Always check the nutrition facts label to find out the amounts of fat, cholesterol, sodium, carbohydrates, and more. Here are some of the items listed that you&rsquoll want to pay close attention to.

Serving size
The serving size is listed at the top of the label. While a food item may appear low in fat or calories, you might notice that the serving size is tiny. Keep this in mind when measuring portions.

Calories (kcal)
Calories provide a measurement of how much energy you obtain after eating a serving size of a specific food.

Nutrients
The nutrients listed on a food label refer to total fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, carbohydrates (including fiber and added sugars), protein, vitamin A, C, calcium and iron. Other nutrients may be included if the manufacturer decides to do so.

Percent daily values
These listings provide an estimate of the percentage of a nutrient from one serving in typical 2000-calorie diet.

&bull If a food provides 5 per cent or less of a nutrient, it&rsquos considered a poor source of that nutrient.

&bull Foods that provide 10-20 per cent of your daily-recommended amount of a nutrient are a good source of that nutrient.

&bull If a food provides more than 20 percent, it&rsquos considered high in that nutrient.

Ingredient list
The ingredient list is always ordered from most prominent ingredient to the least. In other words, if the first item on the ingredient list is sugar, the food contains more sugar than any other ingredient. Beware of foods that list sugar (including high fructose corn syrup or sucrose), fats, oils or salt as one of their first two ingredients. These are not your healthiest choices.