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Cod with Romesco Sauce, Hazelnuts, Lemon, and Parsley

Cod with Romesco Sauce, Hazelnuts, Lemon, and Parsley


Charring then steaming the peppers ensures that the romesco will reach a saucy, juicy consistency.

Ingredients

Romesco

  • 6 tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • 1 medium tomato, halved crosswise, seeded
  • 2 garlic cloves, finely grated
  • 2 tablespoons sherry vinegar
  • ½ teaspoon hot smoked Spanish paprika
  • ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper

Fish and Assembly

  • 4 6-ounce skinless cod fillets
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil, plus more for serving
  • 2 teaspoons finely grated lemon zest
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 2 cups parsley leaves with tender stems

Recipe Preparation

Romesco

  • Preheat oven to 350º. Toast hazelnuts on a rimmed baking sheet, tossing once, until golden brown and fragrant, 7–10 minutes; let cool. Smash hazelnuts in a mortar and pestle until very coarsely ground. (Alternatively, you can crush using the bottom of a mug or small saucepan.) Transfer to a small bowl. Stir in 2 Tbsp. oil and season with salt; set aside.

  • Place a rack in upper third of oven and heat broiler. Broil peppers and tomatoes, skin side up, on a rimmed baking sheet, turning peppers occasionally, until charred all around and flesh is soft, 12–15 minutes.

  • Slip off tomato skins; discard. Transfer peppers to a medium bowl and cover with plastic wrap so they can steam a bit (this extends the cooking and also makes the charred peels easier to remove). Peel peppers (flesh should feel slippery) and discard seeds; coarsely chop. Transfer peppers and tomatoes to a mortar and pestle and smash, covering the mortar slightly with your hands to prevent juices from splattering everywhere, until mixture achieves a saucy consistency. (You can also do this by pulsing in a food processor.)

  • Transfer romesco sauce to a clean medium bowl. Add garlic, vinegar, paprika, cayenne, and remaining ¼ cup oil; season with salt and let sit 15 minutes.

Fish and Assembly

  • Preheat oven to 350°. Place fish a rimmed baking sheet and rub with with 2 Tbsp. oil; season with salt on both sides. Bake fish until cooked through and a paring knife can easily slip through flesh, 10–12 minutes. Top with zest while fish is hot.

  • Toss parsley, lemon juice, a drizzle of oil, and a pinch of salt in a small bowl. Spoon romesco onto plates, then spoon reserved oily hazelnuts over sauce. Arrange fish over, then top with parsley mixture.

Reviews SectionFollowed the recipe to the letter (the pic does not show the hazelnuts crushed as per the recipe!). This version of the Romero sauce is excellent and indeed is particularly suited to rather bland tasting but firm-flesh fish such as Cod. My partner and I thoroughly enjoyed it. Will repeat.I actually used a very good prepared Romesco sauce - Haven's Kitchen. But my question is how do you divide the hazelnuts (if you do). I don't think you mention how much to reserve and how much to put in the sauce.AnonymousNew Jersey09/01/19

Olive and salt cod buñuelos

Soak the salt cod for 36 hours in cold water, changing every so often. Drain and cut into 2cm chunks.

Put the potatoes in a pan of cold salted water, bring to the boil then simmer for 15 minutes until tender but not broken down. Drain well.

Meanwhile, cover the salt cod with cold water and bring to a rolling boil then drain, reserving 175ml of the cooking water. Remove the skin and bones and flake up the fish.

Heat the oil and garlic together over a low heat for a minute until aromatic then stir in the flour and cook for a minute more. Gradually add the cooking water, stirring till you have a smooth thick sauce. Fold in the olives and tip into a stand mixer with a paddle attachment. Add the cod and potatoes and beat until combined and most of the cod and potatoes have broken down but it’s not yet smooth then beat in the egg. You can do this vigorously with a wooden spoon as well. Spoon into a bowl and cover and chill for at least three hours.

Make the alioli. Whisk the yolks with the vinegar and a good pinch of sea salt and ground white pepper. Steep the saffron in the water for a minute then add to the egg yolks with the garlic. Gradually whisk in the oils until you have. Thick glossy, vibrant yellow alioli. Add lemon juice to taste.

Heat the oil in a deep sided saucepan to 180c. Use two dessert spoons to scoop and shape spoonfuls of the bunuelos mixture together, making sure you press it together well, and drop them into the hot oil a few at a time and cook for 2-3 minutes until golden.

Drain on kitchen paper and repeat with the rest of mixture. Serve hot with the alioli to dunk them in.


A Balance of Flavor and Texture

I love it when a sauce has a good balance of both flavor and texture. This romesco sauce is both. It’s thicker than other common sauces because it contains raw almonds and bread.

Texture: The raw almonds add a nice rustic-style texture. If you’re not a huge fan of almonds, you can also use pine nuts, hazelnuts, or cashews. As for the bread, I use rustic farmhouse style bread. Any rustic-style rustic bread that can add body and texture to the sauce will work. Don’t use soft bread.

Flavor: the combination of the roasted red bell peppers, roasted garlic, tomatoes, spices, and fresh herbs all come together to make the best sauce ever. The secret ingredient here is the roasted garlic. Definitely a flavor booster!

Great texture and flavor. That’s what makes a great sauce.


Roast whole fish with salsa romesco

Heat the grill to high. Put the peppers, skin-side up, onto a baking tray and grill for about 20 mins until the skins blacken all over. Put them into a food bag, seal, then leave for 10 mins. Once cool, peel away the skins. Tear the flesh into strips. Mix with the tomatoes, garlic and chilli in a bowl. Roughly chop most of the parsley leaves and add to the bowl with the hazelnuts, vinegar and oil, then stir well. This salad ‘matures’ well, and tastes even better if you can make it a few hours ahead.

When ready to cook, heat oven to 200C/180C fan/gas 6. Rinse and dry the fish, score the flesh on each side, then put the parsley stalks and a few lemon slices into the cavities. Put a few more lemon slices in an oiled baking dish and lay the fish on top. Season the fish well, drizzle with more olive oil, scatter with remaining parsley, then roast for 20 mins, until the flesh flakes easily.

Serve the fish from the dish, set the bowl of salad and the potatoes alongside, then dig in.


Olive and salt cod buñuelos

20 serves

450g floury potatoes, cut into chunks

3 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

120g pitted gordal olive, roughly chopped 1 large free range egg

1ltr vegetable or mild olive oil to deep fry

Salsa

2 tsp apple vinegar Pinch saffron strands 1tbsp of hot water 250ml light olive oil

50ml extra virgin olive oil Lemon juice to taste

Method

Soak the salt cod for 36 hours in cold water, changing every so often. Drain and cut into 2cm chunks.

Put the potatoes in a pan of cold salted water, bring to the boil then simmer for 15 minutes until tender but not broken down. Drain well.

Meanwhile, cover the salt cod with cold water and bring to a rolling boil then drain, reserving 175ml of the cooking water. Remove the skin and bones and flake up the fish.

Heat the oil and garlic together over a low heat for a minute until aromatic then stir in the flour and cook for a minute more. Gradually add the cooking water, stirring till you have a smooth thick sauce. Fold in the olives and tip into a stand mixer with a paddle attachment. Add the cod and potatoes and beat until combined and most of the cod and potatoes have broken down but it’s not yet smooth then beat in the egg. You can do this vigorously with a wooden spoon as well. Spoon into a bowl and cover and chill for at least three hours.

Make the alioli. Whisk the yolks with the vinegar and a good pinch of sea salt and ground white pepper. Steep the saffron in the water for a minute then add to the egg yolks with the garlic. Gradually whisk in the oils until you have. Thick glossy, vibrant yellow alioli. Add lemon juice to taste.

Heat the oil in a deep sided saucepan to 180c. Use two dessert spoons to scoop and shape spoonfuls of the bunuelos mixture together, making sure you press it together well, and drop them into the hot oil a few at a time and cook for 2-3 minutes until golden.

Drain on kitchen paper and repeat with the rest of mixture. Serve hot with the alioli to dunk them in.


How to make this Romesco sauce without nuts

I highly suggest investing in a food processor or mini prep if you plan on meal prepping and making your own sauces, vinaigrettes, and dips from scratch. I have both, but use my full size processor 90% of the time.

A blender is a great backup option. Blenders will give you a silky smooth texture, but with a sauce like this, you’ll want a little bit of chunkiness from the seeds. I’ve also found that if you’re making a small batch, there’s often not enough volume for a blender to do it’s job properly as many of the ingredients get trapped under the blades and don’t get fully incorporated. You don’t want that!

The beauty of this recipe is that you simply add all of the ingredients to the food processor and pulse until they are incorporated. With the machine turned on, you will slowly drizzle in the olive oil to achieve that rich and creamy texture.

Unlike a traditional pesto, this sauce uses much less olive oil since the roasted red peppers add a lot of moisture themselves. Plus, this romesco sauce without nuts is vegan and doesn’t contain any parmesan which would normally dry out the mixture and necessitate more oil. Not that I have anything against parmesan!


Salt cod a la llauna with rosemary potatoes and romesco

Australian Gourmet Traveller Spanish recipe for salt cod a la llauna with rosemary potatoes and romesco by Javier Codina from Gianni restaurant.

Salt cod a la llauna with rosemary potatoes and romesco

Ingredients

  • 800 gm salt cod, skin on, soaked overnight in cold water (changing water several times), drained
  • 50 gm (1/3 cup) plain flour
  • 50 ml olive oil
  • 1 long red chilli, thinly sliced
  • 4 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
  • 2 tbsp sweet paprika
  • 1 tbsp sherry vinegar
  • 2 tbsp flat-leaf parsley, finely chopped
  • 2 vine-ripened tomatoes
  • 6 garlic cloves
  • ½ small onion, coarsely chopped
  • 3 nyoras (see note)
  • 520 ml olive oil, for frying
  • 10 gm each blanched almonds and hazelnuts
  • 2 flat-leaf parsley sprigs
  • 1 thick slice of soft white bread, crust on, diced
  • 50 ml extra-virgin olive oil
  • 20 ml sherry vinegar
  • 4 nicola potatoes, cut into 1cm slices
  • 200 ml olive oil
  • 6 garlic cloves
  • 3 rosemary sprigs

Method

Notes

Nyoras are a type of Catalan chilli that are in the early stages of cultivation in Australia. If unavailable, you can substitute with rehydrated dried nyoras, available from Spanish delicatessens, or 2 red capsicums.


Cod with Romesco Sauce, Hazelnuts, Lemon, and Parsley - Recipes

The discovery of a new dish does more for the happiness of the human race than the discovery of a star.”
Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin, French Gastronome & lawyer (1755- 1826)

My friend Susan Wells brought a bowl of bright red, chunky sauce surrounded with crackers and toast points to the garden club potluck. Smothering a cracker with the mixture, I popped it in my mouth. A taste explosion! Bright, tomato and sweet pepper flavors with rich undertones, a pop of acidity, hints of charred roasting, and just the perfect amount of garlic and savory seasonings.

“Romesco sauce”, Susan explained to me. A prolific gardener, she often prepares Romesco sauce in high summer, with freshly roasted sweet bell peppers and cherry tomatoes. This adaptation was her winter version, prepared with pantry items and a quick blend in the food processor.

It was love at first bite! And Susan graciously sent along the recipe.

Romesco sauce was a new taste sensation and unknown culinary territory for me. A bit of research revealed that this lusty sauce or, “salsa romesco”, originated from Tarragona, in Northeastern Spain. Area fishermen made Romesco in a mortar and pestle to eat with the local catch of the day, often cod. As with all locally inspired cuisines, there are many family variations.

Traditional recipes combine roasted red peppers with ground almonds, olive oil, and vinegar to make a smooth, rich and nutty sauce that tastes great even simply spread on a slice of rustic bread. Some versions use a combination of toasted nuts, usually almonds and hazelnuts. I substituted pecans for the hazelnuts, another time I’ll try pine nuts.

The body of the sauce usually includes fresh, sun-ripened, sweet tomatoes, also roasted to enhance the flavor. Utilizing just pantry ingredients, I captured the flavors from a jar of my roasted Blush tomato sauce. Susan’s formula calls for a pint of cherry tomatoes.

While roasting the garlic provides a mellower flavor, I like the sharper taste of fresh garlic. In many traditional recipes, flour or ground, stale bread may be added as a thickener or to provide texture. Try adding fresh herbs like mint or fennel fronds, particularly when serving with fish.

Romesco sauce truly shines with seafood. We enjoyed it over baked haddock one night for supper and spread it on toasted rolls for a grilled halibut sandwich at lunch. I even mixed Romesco with chopped razor clams and served them up with garlic toast points for a localvore special.

Romesco is a very popular sauce in Spain, especially in the Catalonia region. Tasty with meats like lamb and chicken, or as a side for vegetables, the bright flavors of Romesco sauce are addictive.

The discovery of this dish was wonderful with my pantry items. I can hardly wait to try Romesco sauce with just-picked, perfectly ripe tomatoes and peppers, wood roasted with garlic, herbs from the garden, and freshly caught, Crockett Cove fish. That could be heaven.


Cod with Romesco Sauce, Hazelnuts, Lemon, and Parsley - Recipes

Here are three recipes from esteemed Spanish chef Jose Pizarro, created in partnership with Olives from Spain.

Exciting and sophisticated , Jose’s recipes show the versatility of Spanish olives.

Roast Spiced cauliflower with Romesco and Olives

1 large cauliflower, outermost leaves removed

1tsp each smoked hot and smoked sweet pimenton

6 sprigs fresh thyme, leaves stripped

25g roasted flaked almonds

2tbsp chopped flat leaf parsley

For the black olive romesco

350g roasted red peppers from a jar

100g black hojiblanca olives, pitted

1 tsp smoked sweet pimenton

5 tbsp extra virgin olive oils

  1. Heat the oven to 200c. Fan 180c. Mix the pimentons with the thyme leaves and olive oil and rub all over the cauliflower. Sit into a small roasting tin and season well. Add a good splash of boiling water and roast for 40 minutes. Drizzle with the sherry and lemon juice and return to the oven for 10 minutes more.
  2. Meanwhile, bash the almonds and hazelnuts in a pestle and mortar to rough crumbs. Whiz the peppers and olives together with the garlic, vinegar and pimenton. Season and stir in the roughly ground nuts and breadcrumbs. Add the oil.
  3. Serve wedges of the cauliflower on a bed of romesco sauce and scatter with the flaked almonds and parsley.

Rioja Braised Beef with Olives and Chickpeas

2kg shin of beef, ox cheek or other braising cut, cut into large pieces

1 large onion, finely sliced

2 sticks celery, finely diced

5 whole cloves garlic, peeled

4-5 fresh oregano stalks, leaves picked

400g tin chickpeas, drained

  1. Heat the oven to 150c fan 130c. Heat half of the oil in a large casserole. Season the meat and brown all over, in batches, adding a little more oil as you go. Set aside on a plate.
  2. Add the onion and celery to the pan with any remaining oil and fry for 10 minutes until softened. Add the garlic, oregano and tomato purée and cook for a minute more.
  3. Return the meat to the pan and splash in the rioja and stock. Season and bring to the boil the cover and transfer to the oven for 3 1⁄2 – 4 hours until the meat is really tender.
  4. Add the olives and chickpeas and cook for a further 15 – 20 minutes then serve.

Olive and Salt Cod

450g floury potatoes, cut into chunks

3 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

pitted gordal olive, roughly chopped

1ltr vegetable or mild olive oil to deep fry

50ml extra virgin olive oil

  1. Soak the salt cod for 36 hours in cold water, changing every so often. Drain and cut into 2cm chunks.
  2. Put the potatoes in a pan of cold salted water, bring to the boil then simmer for 15 minutes until tender but not broken down. Drain well.
  3. Meanwhile, cover the salt cod with cold water and bring to a rolling boil then drain, reserving 175ml of the cooking water. Remove the skin and bones and flake up the fish.
  4. Heat the oil and garlic together over a low heat for a minute until aromatic then stir in the flour and cook for a minute more. Gradually add the cooking water, stirring till you have a smooth thick sauce. Fold in the olives and tip into a stand mixer with a paddle attachment. Add the cod and potatoes and beat until combined and most of the cod and potatoes have broken down but it’s not yet smooth then beat in the egg. You can do this vigorously with a wooden spoon as well. Spoon into a bowl and cover and chill for at least three hours.
  5. Make the alioli. Whisk the yolks with the vinegar and a good pinch of sea salt and ground white pepper. Steep the saffron in the water for a minute then add to the egg yolks with the garlic. Gradually whisk in the oils until you have. Thick glossy, vibrant yellow alioli. Add lemon juice to taste.
  6. Heat the oil in a deep sided saucepan to 180c. Use two dessert spoons to scoop and shape spoonfuls of the buñuelos mixture together, making sure you press it together well, and drop them into the hot oil a few at a time and cook for 2-3 minutes until golden.

Drain on kitchen paper and repeat with the rest of mixture. Serve hot with the alioli to dunk them in.


Method

Heat the oven to 200c. Fan 180c. Mix the pimentons with they thyme leaves and olive oil and rub all over the cauliflower. Sit into a small roasting tin and season well. Add a good splash of boiling water and roast for 40 minutes.
Drizzle with the sherry and lemon juice and return to the oven for 10 minutes more.
Meanwhile, bash the almonds and hazelnuts in a pestle and mortar to rough crumbs.
Whiz the peppers and olives together with the garlic, vinegar and pimenton. Season and stir in the roughly ground nuts and breadcrumbs. Add the oil.
Serve wedges of the cauliflower on a bed of romesco sauce and scatter with the flaked almonds and parsley.

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