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Daddy Yankee Delivers Food to Puerto Ricans Suffering Through the Aftermath of Hurricane Maria

Daddy Yankee Delivers Food to Puerto Ricans Suffering Through the Aftermath of Hurricane Maria


The pop star also donated a hefty sum of money to a local food bank

Reggaeton superstar Daddy Yankee touched down in Puerto Rico to help with disaster relief efforts as the country continues to bounce back from the damage of Hurricane Maria. CNN reports that the musician, best known for the club banger “Gasolina,” arrived in Toa Baja on September 30 to hand-deliver 59-pound boxes of rice, pasta, tuna, beans, beef, water, and milk to people desperately in need of supplies.

The singer, whose birth name is Ramon Luis Ayala, also donated $100,000 to the Food Bank of Puerto Rico, which will provide meals to 9,000 families in Toa Baja, a poverty-stricken town of 80,000 people 18 miles from San Juan. Currently, not a single household there has electricity, and only 25 percent have running water. Fifty percent of gas stations are functioning, and most supermarkets have reopened but are rationing food.

“A lot of people don’t know I’m from Puerto Rico,” Yankee said in an interview on CNN’s New Day last month. “I have my family there, I have my wife, my daughter, and I live there still ... and we really need your help.”

In the same interview, the pop star pledged to donate $1 million toward relief efforts for his native country. He joins Jennifer Lopez, who has promised the same amount. To read more about the generosity of others, take a look at the most inspiring food stories of 2017.


The Latest: Trump notes Puerto Rico devastation – and debt

The Latest on tropical weather, evacuations and efforts to help hurricane victims (all times local):

September 25

Marc Anthony has some scathing words for Donald Trump, pleading with the president to forget about football and focus instead on hurricane-hammered Puerto Rico.

Anthony tweeted on Monday night: “Mr. President shut the f— up about NFL. Do something about our people in need in #PuertoRico. We are American Citizens too.”

The 49-year-old singer was born in New York, but his parents are from Puerto Rico, which was hit hard by Hurricane Maria.

Trump did tweet about Puerto Rico later Monday night, but dwelled on the island’s “billions of dollars” of debt to “Wall Street and the banks.”

Anthony is one of many entertainers with Puerto Rican roots trying to summon support.

“Hamilton” star Lin-Manuel tweeted that he’s “texting every famous Puerto Rican singer I know and several I don’t.”

President Donald Trump is finally tweeting about Puerto Rico – but his message may not be well-received by residents struggling with the devastation caused by Hurricane Maria.

Trump says in a trio of tweets Monday night that “Puerto Rico, which was already suffering from broken infrastructure & massive debt, is in deep trouble.”

Trump says the island’s electrical system was “devastated” and much of the island “was destroyed.” He’s also noting Puerto Rico owes “billions of dollars” to “Wall Street and the banks” which, he says, “sadly, must be dealt with.”

He says food, water and medicine are top priorities, and adds the words “doing well.”

His administration is facing steep criticism that its response to Hurricane Maria has fallen short.

It’s already been five days with no lights or air conditioning, and Puerto Rico is looking at many, many more. The power is still out on nearly all the island after Hurricane Maria smashed poles, snarled power lines and flooded electricity-generating plants, knocking out a grid that was already considered antiquated compared to the U.S. mainland.

Power had been restored to a handful of hospitals and surrounding areas by Monday afternoon but Public Affairs Secretary Ramon Rosario said it will take months to fully restore power to the island.

Getting the power back isn’t just a matter of comfort. A long delay will mean even more pain for a Puerto Rican economy that’s already reeling from a decade-long recession.

With no power, even more people will leave the island to find better opportunities on the mainland and further drain its workforce. The downed power system is also damaging the tourism industry, which contributed 8 percent to Puerto Rico’s economy last year.

A Pentagon spokesman, Col. Rob Manning, said the Defense Department is working around the clock to deliver humanitarian assistance to Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

The USS Kearsarge has conducted medical evacuations and airlifted relief supplies to Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

On Sunday , the Kearsarge inserted Marine and Navy teams into Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico, to clear main roads and the airfield to enable additional air support to the overall relief effort.

The military also is helping to restore power on Puerto Rico by providing generators and the fuel to run them.

Meanwhile, the Navy has worked with the Coast Guard to reopen the port of San Juan.

Eight Army UH-60 helicopters from Fort Campbell, Kentucky, are also being flown to San Juan international airport to increase the capacity for distributing relief supplies on the island.

And the Army Corps of Engineers has “conducted a preliminary inspection” of a dam in Puerto Rico that has raised concerns in recent days.

The Trump administration says it is not planning to waive federal restrictions on foreign ships’ transportation of cargo to Puerto Rico and other areas affected by Hurricane Maria, as it did following hurricanes Harvey and Irma.

A spokesman for the Department of Homeland Security says officials believe there is sufficient capacity of U.S.-flagged vessels to move goods to Puerto Rico. Spokesman David Lapan said most of the humanitarian shipments to Puerto Rico will be through barges, which make up a significant portion of the U.S.-flagged cargo fleet.

DHS waived Jones Act restrictions during Harvey and Irma in order to move oil more quickly to the East Coast and make up for the loss of pipelines.

New York Rep Nydia Velazquez has asked for a Jones Act waiver for Maria.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo says President Donald Trump should focus more on hurricane recovery and less on football players.

The Democrat told business leaders Monday that the Republican president’s criticism of NFL players who protest during the national anthem is divisive. He said Trump should pay more attention to helping residents in Florida, Texas, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands still reeling from destructive hurricanes.

Following the storms Cuomo visited Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands in a show of solidarity and to better understand how New York can help. The state is sending personnel and supplies such as drinking water and electric generators.

Cuomo has been mentioned as a possible White House contender in 2020. He’s seeking a third term as governor next year.

A New Jersey family is desperately trying to find a way to get an elderly woman stranded in Puerto Rico to the airport to fly out for treatment for carcinoid tumors in her lungs.

Lisa Suhay says she’s been working with Madeline “Sally” Hennessey’s family to try to get her to the airport in time for a humanitarian flight Monday – or on a scheduled Delta flight Thursday .

“From our end, it’s hoping and praying,” said Hennessey’s daughter, Beth O’Brien, of Wall Township, New Jersey. “We’re trying to contact everybody that we can to get her to the airport.”

Hennessey says her 80-year-old mother needs an injection every 28 days and the next one is scheduled for Oct. 13 . The elderly woman also has an oxygen tank, which needs to remain plugged in. The building where the woman is staying is powered by emergency generators, but the family worries about what will happen if that runs out. They say the woman is having a hard time breathing because of the lack of air conditioning.

The Department of Homeland Security says it’s not planning to waive federal restrictions on foreign ships’ transportation of cargo to Puerto Rico and other areas affected by Hurricane Maria, as it did following hurricanes Harvey and Irma.

A Homeland Security spokesman says that, based on consultation with the Energy Department and other federal agencies, officials believe there is sufficient capacity of U.S.-flagged vessels to move goods to Puerto Rico. Spokesman David Lapan said most of the humanitarian shipments to Puerto Rico will be through barges, which make up a significant portion of the US-flagged cargo fleet.

Lapan said officials waived the Jones Act after hurricanes Harvey and Irma in order to move oil to the East Coast. The waiver also helped make up for the loss of high-capacity pipelines.

The chief of police in Dominica says the confirmed death toll has risen to 27 from Hurricane Maria’s strike on the Caribbean island.

Chief Daniel Carbon told reporters Monday that the toll had risen from 15. He said another 27 were missing.

Maria slammed into the small island on Sept. 18 as a Category 5 hurricane, causing devastating damage, before continuing on to hit Puerto Rico.

The top Democrat in the House is calling upon President Donald Trump to deploy the military to help with the humanitarian crisis in Puerto Rico.

The island territory of more than 3 million U.S. citizens is reeling in the devastating wake of Hurricane Maria. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi says Pentagon resources are needed for search-and-rescue operations, maintaining order, and help with transportation.

The California Democrat also said that the people of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands “deserve to know that their government will be there for them, without question or hesitation.”

The devastation in Puerto Rico has received relatively little media coverage compared to Harvey and Hurricane Irma, and President Donald Trump hasn’t brought much attention to it.

House Speaker Paul Ryan promises that Washington will make sure that the people of hurricane-devastated Puerto Rico will “have what they need.”

The Wisconsin Republican’s statement came as authorities struggle to provide adequate relief to the more than 3 million U.S. citizens on the island territory, which is without power and has seen terrible devastation.

Ryan said Congress is working with the administration to make sure Puerto Rico gets all of the help that’s required. Lawmakers approved $15 billion in hurricane relief in the wake of Harvey but tens of billions of dollars more is sure to be needed in the weeks and months ahead.

The tragedy has received relatively little media coverage compared to Harvey and Hurricane Irma, and President Donald Trump hasn’t brought much attention to it.

House Speaker Paul Ryan promises that Washington will make sure that the people of hurricane-devastated Puerto Rico will “have what they need.”

The Wisconsin Republican’s statement came as authorities struggle to provide adequate relief to the more than 3 million U.S. citizens on the island territory, which is without power and has seen terrible devastation.

Ryan said Congress is working with the administration to make sure Puerto Rico gets all of the help that’s required. Lawmakers approved $15 billion in hurricane relief in the wake of Harvey but tens of billions of dollars more is sure to be needed in the weeks and months ahead.

The tragedy has received relatively little media coverage compared to Harvey and Hurricane Irma, and President Donald Trump hasn’t brought much attention to it.

September 24

The U.S. Department of Energy says initial damage assessments and power restoration efforts have begun on Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

The agency said Sunday that it is coordinating with the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority, FEMA and a team from the New York Power Authority, including the use of drones and helicopters. Restoration efforts to some critical facilities are underway.

An eight-member team from the Energy Department’s Western Area Power Authority that was deployed to Puerto Rico ahead of the storm and assisted with initial damage assessments has been redeployed to St. Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

The Energy Department says additional DOE responders are prepared to deploy to Puerto Rico and will do so as soon as transportation can be arranged.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Sunday launched a state effort to help hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico.

The Democrat announced the relief effort after visiting the island Friday. It will encourage residents statewide to donate goods and will raise funds from the business community for organizations in Puerto Rico.

It also will include efforts from medical professionals to send health care workers from New York to the island and provide support in getting medicine and medical supplies.

Cuomo was joined by entertainer Jennifer Lopez for the announcement.

Lopez, co-chair of the Empire State Relief & Recovery Effort, urged people to support Puerto Rico, the Caribbean and Mexico with donations and contributions.

“I cannot tell you what it meant to me and to the people of Puerto Rico to see New York not only pledge support but Governor Cuomo to actually show up with resources and supplies,” Lopez said.

Cuomo also made a reference to Republican President Donald Trump’s comments criticizing athletes who protest during the national anthem, saying “instead of arguing with football players … why don’t we put the politics aside and focus on helping Americans in desperate need.”

Hurricane Maria slammed into Puerto Rico on Wednesday with heavy winds and rain, knocking out all power to the island. During his visit, Cuomo said he witnessed “breathtaking” devastation. The week before, Cuomo traveled to the U.S. Virgin Islands following Hurricane Irma.

A New York member of Congress who traveled to Puerto Rico with New York’s governor to assess damage by Hurricane Maria says the U.S. territory and the state are inextricably linked.

Democratic Rep. Nydia Velazquez says: “For New Yorkers, Puerto Ricans are family – for some figuratively and, for many of us, literally. New Yorkers take care of their family.”

She notes Puerto Rico was already struggling from a decade-long economic slump, but now “the island has been dealt a crushing blow and needs all the assistance it can get.”

Velazquez has been named by New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo to co-chair a state effort to support Puerto Rico’s recovery.

She says that she and others in the New York congressional delegation will be advocating for federal funding to swiftly repair and rebuild Puerto Rico’s electrical grid, help small businesses recover and address other problems.

Jennifer Lopez has pledged $1 million toward hurricane relief efforts in her family’s native Puerto Rico.

Lopez announced during a news conference with New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Sunday that she would give money from her ongoing Las Vegas residency to various charities in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria. Lopez says she’s also enlisting the help of her boyfriend, former New York Yankees star Alex Rodriguez, and her ex-husband, Marc Anthony.

The 48-year-old Lopez was born in New York to Puerto Rican parents. She says she still has family on the island that she has yet hear from.

Fellow singer Ricky Martin has donated $100,000 to the relief effort and launched an online fundraiser. Puerto Rican rapper Daddy Yankee is sending four truckloads of supplies donated by his fans.

Puerto Rico’s government says engineers will inspect the Guajataca Dam on Sunday to determine the extent of damage inflicted by Hurricane Maria last week.

The dam was cracked but had not burst by late Saturday. But Public Affairs Secretary Ramon Rosario Rosario said in a statement that the dam’s “fissure was big and it will collapse at any minute.”

Fears that the dam would fail prompted the government to evacuate nearby residents.

The 345-yard (316-meter) dam was built around 1928. It holds back a man-made lake covering about 2 square miles (5 square kilometers).

More than 15 inches (nearly 40 centimeters) of rain from Maria fell on the surrounding mountains.

San Juan’s cruiseship and cargo ports are nearly empty after Hurricane María on Sept. 24. (CB photo)


The Latest: Trump notes Puerto Rico devastation – and debt

The Latest on tropical weather, evacuations and efforts to help hurricane victims (all times local):

September 25

Marc Anthony has some scathing words for Donald Trump, pleading with the president to forget about football and focus instead on hurricane-hammered Puerto Rico.

Anthony tweeted on Monday night: “Mr. President shut the f— up about NFL. Do something about our people in need in #PuertoRico. We are American Citizens too.”

The 49-year-old singer was born in New York, but his parents are from Puerto Rico, which was hit hard by Hurricane Maria.

Trump did tweet about Puerto Rico later Monday night, but dwelled on the island’s “billions of dollars” of debt to “Wall Street and the banks.”

Anthony is one of many entertainers with Puerto Rican roots trying to summon support.

“Hamilton” star Lin-Manuel tweeted that he’s “texting every famous Puerto Rican singer I know and several I don’t.”

President Donald Trump is finally tweeting about Puerto Rico – but his message may not be well-received by residents struggling with the devastation caused by Hurricane Maria.

Trump says in a trio of tweets Monday night that “Puerto Rico, which was already suffering from broken infrastructure & massive debt, is in deep trouble.”

Trump says the island’s electrical system was “devastated” and much of the island “was destroyed.” He’s also noting Puerto Rico owes “billions of dollars” to “Wall Street and the banks” which, he says, “sadly, must be dealt with.”

He says food, water and medicine are top priorities, and adds the words “doing well.”

His administration is facing steep criticism that its response to Hurricane Maria has fallen short.

It’s already been five days with no lights or air conditioning, and Puerto Rico is looking at many, many more. The power is still out on nearly all the island after Hurricane Maria smashed poles, snarled power lines and flooded electricity-generating plants, knocking out a grid that was already considered antiquated compared to the U.S. mainland.

Power had been restored to a handful of hospitals and surrounding areas by Monday afternoon but Public Affairs Secretary Ramon Rosario said it will take months to fully restore power to the island.

Getting the power back isn’t just a matter of comfort. A long delay will mean even more pain for a Puerto Rican economy that’s already reeling from a decade-long recession.

With no power, even more people will leave the island to find better opportunities on the mainland and further drain its workforce. The downed power system is also damaging the tourism industry, which contributed 8 percent to Puerto Rico’s economy last year.

A Pentagon spokesman, Col. Rob Manning, said the Defense Department is working around the clock to deliver humanitarian assistance to Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

The USS Kearsarge has conducted medical evacuations and airlifted relief supplies to Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

On Sunday , the Kearsarge inserted Marine and Navy teams into Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico, to clear main roads and the airfield to enable additional air support to the overall relief effort.

The military also is helping to restore power on Puerto Rico by providing generators and the fuel to run them.

Meanwhile, the Navy has worked with the Coast Guard to reopen the port of San Juan.

Eight Army UH-60 helicopters from Fort Campbell, Kentucky, are also being flown to San Juan international airport to increase the capacity for distributing relief supplies on the island.

And the Army Corps of Engineers has “conducted a preliminary inspection” of a dam in Puerto Rico that has raised concerns in recent days.

The Trump administration says it is not planning to waive federal restrictions on foreign ships’ transportation of cargo to Puerto Rico and other areas affected by Hurricane Maria, as it did following hurricanes Harvey and Irma.

A spokesman for the Department of Homeland Security says officials believe there is sufficient capacity of U.S.-flagged vessels to move goods to Puerto Rico. Spokesman David Lapan said most of the humanitarian shipments to Puerto Rico will be through barges, which make up a significant portion of the U.S.-flagged cargo fleet.

DHS waived Jones Act restrictions during Harvey and Irma in order to move oil more quickly to the East Coast and make up for the loss of pipelines.

New York Rep Nydia Velazquez has asked for a Jones Act waiver for Maria.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo says President Donald Trump should focus more on hurricane recovery and less on football players.

The Democrat told business leaders Monday that the Republican president’s criticism of NFL players who protest during the national anthem is divisive. He said Trump should pay more attention to helping residents in Florida, Texas, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands still reeling from destructive hurricanes.

Following the storms Cuomo visited Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands in a show of solidarity and to better understand how New York can help. The state is sending personnel and supplies such as drinking water and electric generators.

Cuomo has been mentioned as a possible White House contender in 2020. He’s seeking a third term as governor next year.

A New Jersey family is desperately trying to find a way to get an elderly woman stranded in Puerto Rico to the airport to fly out for treatment for carcinoid tumors in her lungs.

Lisa Suhay says she’s been working with Madeline “Sally” Hennessey’s family to try to get her to the airport in time for a humanitarian flight Monday – or on a scheduled Delta flight Thursday .

“From our end, it’s hoping and praying,” said Hennessey’s daughter, Beth O’Brien, of Wall Township, New Jersey. “We’re trying to contact everybody that we can to get her to the airport.”

Hennessey says her 80-year-old mother needs an injection every 28 days and the next one is scheduled for Oct. 13 . The elderly woman also has an oxygen tank, which needs to remain plugged in. The building where the woman is staying is powered by emergency generators, but the family worries about what will happen if that runs out. They say the woman is having a hard time breathing because of the lack of air conditioning.

The Department of Homeland Security says it’s not planning to waive federal restrictions on foreign ships’ transportation of cargo to Puerto Rico and other areas affected by Hurricane Maria, as it did following hurricanes Harvey and Irma.

A Homeland Security spokesman says that, based on consultation with the Energy Department and other federal agencies, officials believe there is sufficient capacity of U.S.-flagged vessels to move goods to Puerto Rico. Spokesman David Lapan said most of the humanitarian shipments to Puerto Rico will be through barges, which make up a significant portion of the US-flagged cargo fleet.

Lapan said officials waived the Jones Act after hurricanes Harvey and Irma in order to move oil to the East Coast. The waiver also helped make up for the loss of high-capacity pipelines.

The chief of police in Dominica says the confirmed death toll has risen to 27 from Hurricane Maria’s strike on the Caribbean island.

Chief Daniel Carbon told reporters Monday that the toll had risen from 15. He said another 27 were missing.

Maria slammed into the small island on Sept. 18 as a Category 5 hurricane, causing devastating damage, before continuing on to hit Puerto Rico.

The top Democrat in the House is calling upon President Donald Trump to deploy the military to help with the humanitarian crisis in Puerto Rico.

The island territory of more than 3 million U.S. citizens is reeling in the devastating wake of Hurricane Maria. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi says Pentagon resources are needed for search-and-rescue operations, maintaining order, and help with transportation.

The California Democrat also said that the people of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands “deserve to know that their government will be there for them, without question or hesitation.”

The devastation in Puerto Rico has received relatively little media coverage compared to Harvey and Hurricane Irma, and President Donald Trump hasn’t brought much attention to it.

House Speaker Paul Ryan promises that Washington will make sure that the people of hurricane-devastated Puerto Rico will “have what they need.”

The Wisconsin Republican’s statement came as authorities struggle to provide adequate relief to the more than 3 million U.S. citizens on the island territory, which is without power and has seen terrible devastation.

Ryan said Congress is working with the administration to make sure Puerto Rico gets all of the help that’s required. Lawmakers approved $15 billion in hurricane relief in the wake of Harvey but tens of billions of dollars more is sure to be needed in the weeks and months ahead.

The tragedy has received relatively little media coverage compared to Harvey and Hurricane Irma, and President Donald Trump hasn’t brought much attention to it.

House Speaker Paul Ryan promises that Washington will make sure that the people of hurricane-devastated Puerto Rico will “have what they need.”

The Wisconsin Republican’s statement came as authorities struggle to provide adequate relief to the more than 3 million U.S. citizens on the island territory, which is without power and has seen terrible devastation.

Ryan said Congress is working with the administration to make sure Puerto Rico gets all of the help that’s required. Lawmakers approved $15 billion in hurricane relief in the wake of Harvey but tens of billions of dollars more is sure to be needed in the weeks and months ahead.

The tragedy has received relatively little media coverage compared to Harvey and Hurricane Irma, and President Donald Trump hasn’t brought much attention to it.

September 24

The U.S. Department of Energy says initial damage assessments and power restoration efforts have begun on Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

The agency said Sunday that it is coordinating with the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority, FEMA and a team from the New York Power Authority, including the use of drones and helicopters. Restoration efforts to some critical facilities are underway.

An eight-member team from the Energy Department’s Western Area Power Authority that was deployed to Puerto Rico ahead of the storm and assisted with initial damage assessments has been redeployed to St. Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

The Energy Department says additional DOE responders are prepared to deploy to Puerto Rico and will do so as soon as transportation can be arranged.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Sunday launched a state effort to help hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico.

The Democrat announced the relief effort after visiting the island Friday. It will encourage residents statewide to donate goods and will raise funds from the business community for organizations in Puerto Rico.

It also will include efforts from medical professionals to send health care workers from New York to the island and provide support in getting medicine and medical supplies.

Cuomo was joined by entertainer Jennifer Lopez for the announcement.

Lopez, co-chair of the Empire State Relief & Recovery Effort, urged people to support Puerto Rico, the Caribbean and Mexico with donations and contributions.

“I cannot tell you what it meant to me and to the people of Puerto Rico to see New York not only pledge support but Governor Cuomo to actually show up with resources and supplies,” Lopez said.

Cuomo also made a reference to Republican President Donald Trump’s comments criticizing athletes who protest during the national anthem, saying “instead of arguing with football players … why don’t we put the politics aside and focus on helping Americans in desperate need.”

Hurricane Maria slammed into Puerto Rico on Wednesday with heavy winds and rain, knocking out all power to the island. During his visit, Cuomo said he witnessed “breathtaking” devastation. The week before, Cuomo traveled to the U.S. Virgin Islands following Hurricane Irma.

A New York member of Congress who traveled to Puerto Rico with New York’s governor to assess damage by Hurricane Maria says the U.S. territory and the state are inextricably linked.

Democratic Rep. Nydia Velazquez says: “For New Yorkers, Puerto Ricans are family – for some figuratively and, for many of us, literally. New Yorkers take care of their family.”

She notes Puerto Rico was already struggling from a decade-long economic slump, but now “the island has been dealt a crushing blow and needs all the assistance it can get.”

Velazquez has been named by New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo to co-chair a state effort to support Puerto Rico’s recovery.

She says that she and others in the New York congressional delegation will be advocating for federal funding to swiftly repair and rebuild Puerto Rico’s electrical grid, help small businesses recover and address other problems.

Jennifer Lopez has pledged $1 million toward hurricane relief efforts in her family’s native Puerto Rico.

Lopez announced during a news conference with New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Sunday that she would give money from her ongoing Las Vegas residency to various charities in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria. Lopez says she’s also enlisting the help of her boyfriend, former New York Yankees star Alex Rodriguez, and her ex-husband, Marc Anthony.

The 48-year-old Lopez was born in New York to Puerto Rican parents. She says she still has family on the island that she has yet hear from.

Fellow singer Ricky Martin has donated $100,000 to the relief effort and launched an online fundraiser. Puerto Rican rapper Daddy Yankee is sending four truckloads of supplies donated by his fans.

Puerto Rico’s government says engineers will inspect the Guajataca Dam on Sunday to determine the extent of damage inflicted by Hurricane Maria last week.

The dam was cracked but had not burst by late Saturday. But Public Affairs Secretary Ramon Rosario Rosario said in a statement that the dam’s “fissure was big and it will collapse at any minute.”

Fears that the dam would fail prompted the government to evacuate nearby residents.

The 345-yard (316-meter) dam was built around 1928. It holds back a man-made lake covering about 2 square miles (5 square kilometers).

More than 15 inches (nearly 40 centimeters) of rain from Maria fell on the surrounding mountains.

San Juan’s cruiseship and cargo ports are nearly empty after Hurricane María on Sept. 24. (CB photo)


The Latest: Trump notes Puerto Rico devastation – and debt

The Latest on tropical weather, evacuations and efforts to help hurricane victims (all times local):

September 25

Marc Anthony has some scathing words for Donald Trump, pleading with the president to forget about football and focus instead on hurricane-hammered Puerto Rico.

Anthony tweeted on Monday night: “Mr. President shut the f— up about NFL. Do something about our people in need in #PuertoRico. We are American Citizens too.”

The 49-year-old singer was born in New York, but his parents are from Puerto Rico, which was hit hard by Hurricane Maria.

Trump did tweet about Puerto Rico later Monday night, but dwelled on the island’s “billions of dollars” of debt to “Wall Street and the banks.”

Anthony is one of many entertainers with Puerto Rican roots trying to summon support.

“Hamilton” star Lin-Manuel tweeted that he’s “texting every famous Puerto Rican singer I know and several I don’t.”

President Donald Trump is finally tweeting about Puerto Rico – but his message may not be well-received by residents struggling with the devastation caused by Hurricane Maria.

Trump says in a trio of tweets Monday night that “Puerto Rico, which was already suffering from broken infrastructure & massive debt, is in deep trouble.”

Trump says the island’s electrical system was “devastated” and much of the island “was destroyed.” He’s also noting Puerto Rico owes “billions of dollars” to “Wall Street and the banks” which, he says, “sadly, must be dealt with.”

He says food, water and medicine are top priorities, and adds the words “doing well.”

His administration is facing steep criticism that its response to Hurricane Maria has fallen short.

It’s already been five days with no lights or air conditioning, and Puerto Rico is looking at many, many more. The power is still out on nearly all the island after Hurricane Maria smashed poles, snarled power lines and flooded electricity-generating plants, knocking out a grid that was already considered antiquated compared to the U.S. mainland.

Power had been restored to a handful of hospitals and surrounding areas by Monday afternoon but Public Affairs Secretary Ramon Rosario said it will take months to fully restore power to the island.

Getting the power back isn’t just a matter of comfort. A long delay will mean even more pain for a Puerto Rican economy that’s already reeling from a decade-long recession.

With no power, even more people will leave the island to find better opportunities on the mainland and further drain its workforce. The downed power system is also damaging the tourism industry, which contributed 8 percent to Puerto Rico’s economy last year.

A Pentagon spokesman, Col. Rob Manning, said the Defense Department is working around the clock to deliver humanitarian assistance to Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

The USS Kearsarge has conducted medical evacuations and airlifted relief supplies to Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

On Sunday , the Kearsarge inserted Marine and Navy teams into Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico, to clear main roads and the airfield to enable additional air support to the overall relief effort.

The military also is helping to restore power on Puerto Rico by providing generators and the fuel to run them.

Meanwhile, the Navy has worked with the Coast Guard to reopen the port of San Juan.

Eight Army UH-60 helicopters from Fort Campbell, Kentucky, are also being flown to San Juan international airport to increase the capacity for distributing relief supplies on the island.

And the Army Corps of Engineers has “conducted a preliminary inspection” of a dam in Puerto Rico that has raised concerns in recent days.

The Trump administration says it is not planning to waive federal restrictions on foreign ships’ transportation of cargo to Puerto Rico and other areas affected by Hurricane Maria, as it did following hurricanes Harvey and Irma.

A spokesman for the Department of Homeland Security says officials believe there is sufficient capacity of U.S.-flagged vessels to move goods to Puerto Rico. Spokesman David Lapan said most of the humanitarian shipments to Puerto Rico will be through barges, which make up a significant portion of the U.S.-flagged cargo fleet.

DHS waived Jones Act restrictions during Harvey and Irma in order to move oil more quickly to the East Coast and make up for the loss of pipelines.

New York Rep Nydia Velazquez has asked for a Jones Act waiver for Maria.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo says President Donald Trump should focus more on hurricane recovery and less on football players.

The Democrat told business leaders Monday that the Republican president’s criticism of NFL players who protest during the national anthem is divisive. He said Trump should pay more attention to helping residents in Florida, Texas, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands still reeling from destructive hurricanes.

Following the storms Cuomo visited Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands in a show of solidarity and to better understand how New York can help. The state is sending personnel and supplies such as drinking water and electric generators.

Cuomo has been mentioned as a possible White House contender in 2020. He’s seeking a third term as governor next year.

A New Jersey family is desperately trying to find a way to get an elderly woman stranded in Puerto Rico to the airport to fly out for treatment for carcinoid tumors in her lungs.

Lisa Suhay says she’s been working with Madeline “Sally” Hennessey’s family to try to get her to the airport in time for a humanitarian flight Monday – or on a scheduled Delta flight Thursday .

“From our end, it’s hoping and praying,” said Hennessey’s daughter, Beth O’Brien, of Wall Township, New Jersey. “We’re trying to contact everybody that we can to get her to the airport.”

Hennessey says her 80-year-old mother needs an injection every 28 days and the next one is scheduled for Oct. 13 . The elderly woman also has an oxygen tank, which needs to remain plugged in. The building where the woman is staying is powered by emergency generators, but the family worries about what will happen if that runs out. They say the woman is having a hard time breathing because of the lack of air conditioning.

The Department of Homeland Security says it’s not planning to waive federal restrictions on foreign ships’ transportation of cargo to Puerto Rico and other areas affected by Hurricane Maria, as it did following hurricanes Harvey and Irma.

A Homeland Security spokesman says that, based on consultation with the Energy Department and other federal agencies, officials believe there is sufficient capacity of U.S.-flagged vessels to move goods to Puerto Rico. Spokesman David Lapan said most of the humanitarian shipments to Puerto Rico will be through barges, which make up a significant portion of the US-flagged cargo fleet.

Lapan said officials waived the Jones Act after hurricanes Harvey and Irma in order to move oil to the East Coast. The waiver also helped make up for the loss of high-capacity pipelines.

The chief of police in Dominica says the confirmed death toll has risen to 27 from Hurricane Maria’s strike on the Caribbean island.

Chief Daniel Carbon told reporters Monday that the toll had risen from 15. He said another 27 were missing.

Maria slammed into the small island on Sept. 18 as a Category 5 hurricane, causing devastating damage, before continuing on to hit Puerto Rico.

The top Democrat in the House is calling upon President Donald Trump to deploy the military to help with the humanitarian crisis in Puerto Rico.

The island territory of more than 3 million U.S. citizens is reeling in the devastating wake of Hurricane Maria. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi says Pentagon resources are needed for search-and-rescue operations, maintaining order, and help with transportation.

The California Democrat also said that the people of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands “deserve to know that their government will be there for them, without question or hesitation.”

The devastation in Puerto Rico has received relatively little media coverage compared to Harvey and Hurricane Irma, and President Donald Trump hasn’t brought much attention to it.

House Speaker Paul Ryan promises that Washington will make sure that the people of hurricane-devastated Puerto Rico will “have what they need.”

The Wisconsin Republican’s statement came as authorities struggle to provide adequate relief to the more than 3 million U.S. citizens on the island territory, which is without power and has seen terrible devastation.

Ryan said Congress is working with the administration to make sure Puerto Rico gets all of the help that’s required. Lawmakers approved $15 billion in hurricane relief in the wake of Harvey but tens of billions of dollars more is sure to be needed in the weeks and months ahead.

The tragedy has received relatively little media coverage compared to Harvey and Hurricane Irma, and President Donald Trump hasn’t brought much attention to it.

House Speaker Paul Ryan promises that Washington will make sure that the people of hurricane-devastated Puerto Rico will “have what they need.”

The Wisconsin Republican’s statement came as authorities struggle to provide adequate relief to the more than 3 million U.S. citizens on the island territory, which is without power and has seen terrible devastation.

Ryan said Congress is working with the administration to make sure Puerto Rico gets all of the help that’s required. Lawmakers approved $15 billion in hurricane relief in the wake of Harvey but tens of billions of dollars more is sure to be needed in the weeks and months ahead.

The tragedy has received relatively little media coverage compared to Harvey and Hurricane Irma, and President Donald Trump hasn’t brought much attention to it.

September 24

The U.S. Department of Energy says initial damage assessments and power restoration efforts have begun on Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

The agency said Sunday that it is coordinating with the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority, FEMA and a team from the New York Power Authority, including the use of drones and helicopters. Restoration efforts to some critical facilities are underway.

An eight-member team from the Energy Department’s Western Area Power Authority that was deployed to Puerto Rico ahead of the storm and assisted with initial damage assessments has been redeployed to St. Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

The Energy Department says additional DOE responders are prepared to deploy to Puerto Rico and will do so as soon as transportation can be arranged.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Sunday launched a state effort to help hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico.

The Democrat announced the relief effort after visiting the island Friday. It will encourage residents statewide to donate goods and will raise funds from the business community for organizations in Puerto Rico.

It also will include efforts from medical professionals to send health care workers from New York to the island and provide support in getting medicine and medical supplies.

Cuomo was joined by entertainer Jennifer Lopez for the announcement.

Lopez, co-chair of the Empire State Relief & Recovery Effort, urged people to support Puerto Rico, the Caribbean and Mexico with donations and contributions.

“I cannot tell you what it meant to me and to the people of Puerto Rico to see New York not only pledge support but Governor Cuomo to actually show up with resources and supplies,” Lopez said.

Cuomo also made a reference to Republican President Donald Trump’s comments criticizing athletes who protest during the national anthem, saying “instead of arguing with football players … why don’t we put the politics aside and focus on helping Americans in desperate need.”

Hurricane Maria slammed into Puerto Rico on Wednesday with heavy winds and rain, knocking out all power to the island. During his visit, Cuomo said he witnessed “breathtaking” devastation. The week before, Cuomo traveled to the U.S. Virgin Islands following Hurricane Irma.

A New York member of Congress who traveled to Puerto Rico with New York’s governor to assess damage by Hurricane Maria says the U.S. territory and the state are inextricably linked.

Democratic Rep. Nydia Velazquez says: “For New Yorkers, Puerto Ricans are family – for some figuratively and, for many of us, literally. New Yorkers take care of their family.”

She notes Puerto Rico was already struggling from a decade-long economic slump, but now “the island has been dealt a crushing blow and needs all the assistance it can get.”

Velazquez has been named by New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo to co-chair a state effort to support Puerto Rico’s recovery.

She says that she and others in the New York congressional delegation will be advocating for federal funding to swiftly repair and rebuild Puerto Rico’s electrical grid, help small businesses recover and address other problems.

Jennifer Lopez has pledged $1 million toward hurricane relief efforts in her family’s native Puerto Rico.

Lopez announced during a news conference with New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Sunday that she would give money from her ongoing Las Vegas residency to various charities in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria. Lopez says she’s also enlisting the help of her boyfriend, former New York Yankees star Alex Rodriguez, and her ex-husband, Marc Anthony.

The 48-year-old Lopez was born in New York to Puerto Rican parents. She says she still has family on the island that she has yet hear from.

Fellow singer Ricky Martin has donated $100,000 to the relief effort and launched an online fundraiser. Puerto Rican rapper Daddy Yankee is sending four truckloads of supplies donated by his fans.

Puerto Rico’s government says engineers will inspect the Guajataca Dam on Sunday to determine the extent of damage inflicted by Hurricane Maria last week.

The dam was cracked but had not burst by late Saturday. But Public Affairs Secretary Ramon Rosario Rosario said in a statement that the dam’s “fissure was big and it will collapse at any minute.”

Fears that the dam would fail prompted the government to evacuate nearby residents.

The 345-yard (316-meter) dam was built around 1928. It holds back a man-made lake covering about 2 square miles (5 square kilometers).

More than 15 inches (nearly 40 centimeters) of rain from Maria fell on the surrounding mountains.

San Juan’s cruiseship and cargo ports are nearly empty after Hurricane María on Sept. 24. (CB photo)


The Latest: Trump notes Puerto Rico devastation – and debt

The Latest on tropical weather, evacuations and efforts to help hurricane victims (all times local):

September 25

Marc Anthony has some scathing words for Donald Trump, pleading with the president to forget about football and focus instead on hurricane-hammered Puerto Rico.

Anthony tweeted on Monday night: “Mr. President shut the f— up about NFL. Do something about our people in need in #PuertoRico. We are American Citizens too.”

The 49-year-old singer was born in New York, but his parents are from Puerto Rico, which was hit hard by Hurricane Maria.

Trump did tweet about Puerto Rico later Monday night, but dwelled on the island’s “billions of dollars” of debt to “Wall Street and the banks.”

Anthony is one of many entertainers with Puerto Rican roots trying to summon support.

“Hamilton” star Lin-Manuel tweeted that he’s “texting every famous Puerto Rican singer I know and several I don’t.”

President Donald Trump is finally tweeting about Puerto Rico – but his message may not be well-received by residents struggling with the devastation caused by Hurricane Maria.

Trump says in a trio of tweets Monday night that “Puerto Rico, which was already suffering from broken infrastructure & massive debt, is in deep trouble.”

Trump says the island’s electrical system was “devastated” and much of the island “was destroyed.” He’s also noting Puerto Rico owes “billions of dollars” to “Wall Street and the banks” which, he says, “sadly, must be dealt with.”

He says food, water and medicine are top priorities, and adds the words “doing well.”

His administration is facing steep criticism that its response to Hurricane Maria has fallen short.

It’s already been five days with no lights or air conditioning, and Puerto Rico is looking at many, many more. The power is still out on nearly all the island after Hurricane Maria smashed poles, snarled power lines and flooded electricity-generating plants, knocking out a grid that was already considered antiquated compared to the U.S. mainland.

Power had been restored to a handful of hospitals and surrounding areas by Monday afternoon but Public Affairs Secretary Ramon Rosario said it will take months to fully restore power to the island.

Getting the power back isn’t just a matter of comfort. A long delay will mean even more pain for a Puerto Rican economy that’s already reeling from a decade-long recession.

With no power, even more people will leave the island to find better opportunities on the mainland and further drain its workforce. The downed power system is also damaging the tourism industry, which contributed 8 percent to Puerto Rico’s economy last year.

A Pentagon spokesman, Col. Rob Manning, said the Defense Department is working around the clock to deliver humanitarian assistance to Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

The USS Kearsarge has conducted medical evacuations and airlifted relief supplies to Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

On Sunday , the Kearsarge inserted Marine and Navy teams into Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico, to clear main roads and the airfield to enable additional air support to the overall relief effort.

The military also is helping to restore power on Puerto Rico by providing generators and the fuel to run them.

Meanwhile, the Navy has worked with the Coast Guard to reopen the port of San Juan.

Eight Army UH-60 helicopters from Fort Campbell, Kentucky, are also being flown to San Juan international airport to increase the capacity for distributing relief supplies on the island.

And the Army Corps of Engineers has “conducted a preliminary inspection” of a dam in Puerto Rico that has raised concerns in recent days.

The Trump administration says it is not planning to waive federal restrictions on foreign ships’ transportation of cargo to Puerto Rico and other areas affected by Hurricane Maria, as it did following hurricanes Harvey and Irma.

A spokesman for the Department of Homeland Security says officials believe there is sufficient capacity of U.S.-flagged vessels to move goods to Puerto Rico. Spokesman David Lapan said most of the humanitarian shipments to Puerto Rico will be through barges, which make up a significant portion of the U.S.-flagged cargo fleet.

DHS waived Jones Act restrictions during Harvey and Irma in order to move oil more quickly to the East Coast and make up for the loss of pipelines.

New York Rep Nydia Velazquez has asked for a Jones Act waiver for Maria.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo says President Donald Trump should focus more on hurricane recovery and less on football players.

The Democrat told business leaders Monday that the Republican president’s criticism of NFL players who protest during the national anthem is divisive. He said Trump should pay more attention to helping residents in Florida, Texas, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands still reeling from destructive hurricanes.

Following the storms Cuomo visited Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands in a show of solidarity and to better understand how New York can help. The state is sending personnel and supplies such as drinking water and electric generators.

Cuomo has been mentioned as a possible White House contender in 2020. He’s seeking a third term as governor next year.

A New Jersey family is desperately trying to find a way to get an elderly woman stranded in Puerto Rico to the airport to fly out for treatment for carcinoid tumors in her lungs.

Lisa Suhay says she’s been working with Madeline “Sally” Hennessey’s family to try to get her to the airport in time for a humanitarian flight Monday – or on a scheduled Delta flight Thursday .

“From our end, it’s hoping and praying,” said Hennessey’s daughter, Beth O’Brien, of Wall Township, New Jersey. “We’re trying to contact everybody that we can to get her to the airport.”

Hennessey says her 80-year-old mother needs an injection every 28 days and the next one is scheduled for Oct. 13 . The elderly woman also has an oxygen tank, which needs to remain plugged in. The building where the woman is staying is powered by emergency generators, but the family worries about what will happen if that runs out. They say the woman is having a hard time breathing because of the lack of air conditioning.

The Department of Homeland Security says it’s not planning to waive federal restrictions on foreign ships’ transportation of cargo to Puerto Rico and other areas affected by Hurricane Maria, as it did following hurricanes Harvey and Irma.

A Homeland Security spokesman says that, based on consultation with the Energy Department and other federal agencies, officials believe there is sufficient capacity of U.S.-flagged vessels to move goods to Puerto Rico. Spokesman David Lapan said most of the humanitarian shipments to Puerto Rico will be through barges, which make up a significant portion of the US-flagged cargo fleet.

Lapan said officials waived the Jones Act after hurricanes Harvey and Irma in order to move oil to the East Coast. The waiver also helped make up for the loss of high-capacity pipelines.

The chief of police in Dominica says the confirmed death toll has risen to 27 from Hurricane Maria’s strike on the Caribbean island.

Chief Daniel Carbon told reporters Monday that the toll had risen from 15. He said another 27 were missing.

Maria slammed into the small island on Sept. 18 as a Category 5 hurricane, causing devastating damage, before continuing on to hit Puerto Rico.

The top Democrat in the House is calling upon President Donald Trump to deploy the military to help with the humanitarian crisis in Puerto Rico.

The island territory of more than 3 million U.S. citizens is reeling in the devastating wake of Hurricane Maria. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi says Pentagon resources are needed for search-and-rescue operations, maintaining order, and help with transportation.

The California Democrat also said that the people of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands “deserve to know that their government will be there for them, without question or hesitation.”

The devastation in Puerto Rico has received relatively little media coverage compared to Harvey and Hurricane Irma, and President Donald Trump hasn’t brought much attention to it.

House Speaker Paul Ryan promises that Washington will make sure that the people of hurricane-devastated Puerto Rico will “have what they need.”

The Wisconsin Republican’s statement came as authorities struggle to provide adequate relief to the more than 3 million U.S. citizens on the island territory, which is without power and has seen terrible devastation.

Ryan said Congress is working with the administration to make sure Puerto Rico gets all of the help that’s required. Lawmakers approved $15 billion in hurricane relief in the wake of Harvey but tens of billions of dollars more is sure to be needed in the weeks and months ahead.

The tragedy has received relatively little media coverage compared to Harvey and Hurricane Irma, and President Donald Trump hasn’t brought much attention to it.

House Speaker Paul Ryan promises that Washington will make sure that the people of hurricane-devastated Puerto Rico will “have what they need.”

The Wisconsin Republican’s statement came as authorities struggle to provide adequate relief to the more than 3 million U.S. citizens on the island territory, which is without power and has seen terrible devastation.

Ryan said Congress is working with the administration to make sure Puerto Rico gets all of the help that’s required. Lawmakers approved $15 billion in hurricane relief in the wake of Harvey but tens of billions of dollars more is sure to be needed in the weeks and months ahead.

The tragedy has received relatively little media coverage compared to Harvey and Hurricane Irma, and President Donald Trump hasn’t brought much attention to it.

September 24

The U.S. Department of Energy says initial damage assessments and power restoration efforts have begun on Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

The agency said Sunday that it is coordinating with the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority, FEMA and a team from the New York Power Authority, including the use of drones and helicopters. Restoration efforts to some critical facilities are underway.

An eight-member team from the Energy Department’s Western Area Power Authority that was deployed to Puerto Rico ahead of the storm and assisted with initial damage assessments has been redeployed to St. Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

The Energy Department says additional DOE responders are prepared to deploy to Puerto Rico and will do so as soon as transportation can be arranged.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Sunday launched a state effort to help hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico.

The Democrat announced the relief effort after visiting the island Friday. It will encourage residents statewide to donate goods and will raise funds from the business community for organizations in Puerto Rico.

It also will include efforts from medical professionals to send health care workers from New York to the island and provide support in getting medicine and medical supplies.

Cuomo was joined by entertainer Jennifer Lopez for the announcement.

Lopez, co-chair of the Empire State Relief & Recovery Effort, urged people to support Puerto Rico, the Caribbean and Mexico with donations and contributions.

“I cannot tell you what it meant to me and to the people of Puerto Rico to see New York not only pledge support but Governor Cuomo to actually show up with resources and supplies,” Lopez said.

Cuomo also made a reference to Republican President Donald Trump’s comments criticizing athletes who protest during the national anthem, saying “instead of arguing with football players … why don’t we put the politics aside and focus on helping Americans in desperate need.”

Hurricane Maria slammed into Puerto Rico on Wednesday with heavy winds and rain, knocking out all power to the island. During his visit, Cuomo said he witnessed “breathtaking” devastation. The week before, Cuomo traveled to the U.S. Virgin Islands following Hurricane Irma.

A New York member of Congress who traveled to Puerto Rico with New York’s governor to assess damage by Hurricane Maria says the U.S. territory and the state are inextricably linked.

Democratic Rep. Nydia Velazquez says: “For New Yorkers, Puerto Ricans are family – for some figuratively and, for many of us, literally. New Yorkers take care of their family.”

She notes Puerto Rico was already struggling from a decade-long economic slump, but now “the island has been dealt a crushing blow and needs all the assistance it can get.”

Velazquez has been named by New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo to co-chair a state effort to support Puerto Rico’s recovery.

She says that she and others in the New York congressional delegation will be advocating for federal funding to swiftly repair and rebuild Puerto Rico’s electrical grid, help small businesses recover and address other problems.

Jennifer Lopez has pledged $1 million toward hurricane relief efforts in her family’s native Puerto Rico.

Lopez announced during a news conference with New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Sunday that she would give money from her ongoing Las Vegas residency to various charities in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria. Lopez says she’s also enlisting the help of her boyfriend, former New York Yankees star Alex Rodriguez, and her ex-husband, Marc Anthony.

The 48-year-old Lopez was born in New York to Puerto Rican parents. She says she still has family on the island that she has yet hear from.

Fellow singer Ricky Martin has donated $100,000 to the relief effort and launched an online fundraiser. Puerto Rican rapper Daddy Yankee is sending four truckloads of supplies donated by his fans.

Puerto Rico’s government says engineers will inspect the Guajataca Dam on Sunday to determine the extent of damage inflicted by Hurricane Maria last week.

The dam was cracked but had not burst by late Saturday. But Public Affairs Secretary Ramon Rosario Rosario said in a statement that the dam’s “fissure was big and it will collapse at any minute.”

Fears that the dam would fail prompted the government to evacuate nearby residents.

The 345-yard (316-meter) dam was built around 1928. It holds back a man-made lake covering about 2 square miles (5 square kilometers).

More than 15 inches (nearly 40 centimeters) of rain from Maria fell on the surrounding mountains.

San Juan’s cruiseship and cargo ports are nearly empty after Hurricane María on Sept. 24. (CB photo)


The Latest: Trump notes Puerto Rico devastation – and debt

The Latest on tropical weather, evacuations and efforts to help hurricane victims (all times local):

September 25

Marc Anthony has some scathing words for Donald Trump, pleading with the president to forget about football and focus instead on hurricane-hammered Puerto Rico.

Anthony tweeted on Monday night: “Mr. President shut the f— up about NFL. Do something about our people in need in #PuertoRico. We are American Citizens too.”

The 49-year-old singer was born in New York, but his parents are from Puerto Rico, which was hit hard by Hurricane Maria.

Trump did tweet about Puerto Rico later Monday night, but dwelled on the island’s “billions of dollars” of debt to “Wall Street and the banks.”

Anthony is one of many entertainers with Puerto Rican roots trying to summon support.

“Hamilton” star Lin-Manuel tweeted that he’s “texting every famous Puerto Rican singer I know and several I don’t.”

President Donald Trump is finally tweeting about Puerto Rico – but his message may not be well-received by residents struggling with the devastation caused by Hurricane Maria.

Trump says in a trio of tweets Monday night that “Puerto Rico, which was already suffering from broken infrastructure & massive debt, is in deep trouble.”

Trump says the island’s electrical system was “devastated” and much of the island “was destroyed.” He’s also noting Puerto Rico owes “billions of dollars” to “Wall Street and the banks” which, he says, “sadly, must be dealt with.”

He says food, water and medicine are top priorities, and adds the words “doing well.”

His administration is facing steep criticism that its response to Hurricane Maria has fallen short.

It’s already been five days with no lights or air conditioning, and Puerto Rico is looking at many, many more. The power is still out on nearly all the island after Hurricane Maria smashed poles, snarled power lines and flooded electricity-generating plants, knocking out a grid that was already considered antiquated compared to the U.S. mainland.

Power had been restored to a handful of hospitals and surrounding areas by Monday afternoon but Public Affairs Secretary Ramon Rosario said it will take months to fully restore power to the island.

Getting the power back isn’t just a matter of comfort. A long delay will mean even more pain for a Puerto Rican economy that’s already reeling from a decade-long recession.

With no power, even more people will leave the island to find better opportunities on the mainland and further drain its workforce. The downed power system is also damaging the tourism industry, which contributed 8 percent to Puerto Rico’s economy last year.

A Pentagon spokesman, Col. Rob Manning, said the Defense Department is working around the clock to deliver humanitarian assistance to Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

The USS Kearsarge has conducted medical evacuations and airlifted relief supplies to Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

On Sunday , the Kearsarge inserted Marine and Navy teams into Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico, to clear main roads and the airfield to enable additional air support to the overall relief effort.

The military also is helping to restore power on Puerto Rico by providing generators and the fuel to run them.

Meanwhile, the Navy has worked with the Coast Guard to reopen the port of San Juan.

Eight Army UH-60 helicopters from Fort Campbell, Kentucky, are also being flown to San Juan international airport to increase the capacity for distributing relief supplies on the island.

And the Army Corps of Engineers has “conducted a preliminary inspection” of a dam in Puerto Rico that has raised concerns in recent days.

The Trump administration says it is not planning to waive federal restrictions on foreign ships’ transportation of cargo to Puerto Rico and other areas affected by Hurricane Maria, as it did following hurricanes Harvey and Irma.

A spokesman for the Department of Homeland Security says officials believe there is sufficient capacity of U.S.-flagged vessels to move goods to Puerto Rico. Spokesman David Lapan said most of the humanitarian shipments to Puerto Rico will be through barges, which make up a significant portion of the U.S.-flagged cargo fleet.

DHS waived Jones Act restrictions during Harvey and Irma in order to move oil more quickly to the East Coast and make up for the loss of pipelines.

New York Rep Nydia Velazquez has asked for a Jones Act waiver for Maria.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo says President Donald Trump should focus more on hurricane recovery and less on football players.

The Democrat told business leaders Monday that the Republican president’s criticism of NFL players who protest during the national anthem is divisive. He said Trump should pay more attention to helping residents in Florida, Texas, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands still reeling from destructive hurricanes.

Following the storms Cuomo visited Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands in a show of solidarity and to better understand how New York can help. The state is sending personnel and supplies such as drinking water and electric generators.

Cuomo has been mentioned as a possible White House contender in 2020. He’s seeking a third term as governor next year.

A New Jersey family is desperately trying to find a way to get an elderly woman stranded in Puerto Rico to the airport to fly out for treatment for carcinoid tumors in her lungs.

Lisa Suhay says she’s been working with Madeline “Sally” Hennessey’s family to try to get her to the airport in time for a humanitarian flight Monday – or on a scheduled Delta flight Thursday .

“From our end, it’s hoping and praying,” said Hennessey’s daughter, Beth O’Brien, of Wall Township, New Jersey. “We’re trying to contact everybody that we can to get her to the airport.”

Hennessey says her 80-year-old mother needs an injection every 28 days and the next one is scheduled for Oct. 13 . The elderly woman also has an oxygen tank, which needs to remain plugged in. The building where the woman is staying is powered by emergency generators, but the family worries about what will happen if that runs out. They say the woman is having a hard time breathing because of the lack of air conditioning.

The Department of Homeland Security says it’s not planning to waive federal restrictions on foreign ships’ transportation of cargo to Puerto Rico and other areas affected by Hurricane Maria, as it did following hurricanes Harvey and Irma.

A Homeland Security spokesman says that, based on consultation with the Energy Department and other federal agencies, officials believe there is sufficient capacity of U.S.-flagged vessels to move goods to Puerto Rico. Spokesman David Lapan said most of the humanitarian shipments to Puerto Rico will be through barges, which make up a significant portion of the US-flagged cargo fleet.

Lapan said officials waived the Jones Act after hurricanes Harvey and Irma in order to move oil to the East Coast. The waiver also helped make up for the loss of high-capacity pipelines.

The chief of police in Dominica says the confirmed death toll has risen to 27 from Hurricane Maria’s strike on the Caribbean island.

Chief Daniel Carbon told reporters Monday that the toll had risen from 15. He said another 27 were missing.

Maria slammed into the small island on Sept. 18 as a Category 5 hurricane, causing devastating damage, before continuing on to hit Puerto Rico.

The top Democrat in the House is calling upon President Donald Trump to deploy the military to help with the humanitarian crisis in Puerto Rico.

The island territory of more than 3 million U.S. citizens is reeling in the devastating wake of Hurricane Maria. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi says Pentagon resources are needed for search-and-rescue operations, maintaining order, and help with transportation.

The California Democrat also said that the people of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands “deserve to know that their government will be there for them, without question or hesitation.”

The devastation in Puerto Rico has received relatively little media coverage compared to Harvey and Hurricane Irma, and President Donald Trump hasn’t brought much attention to it.

House Speaker Paul Ryan promises that Washington will make sure that the people of hurricane-devastated Puerto Rico will “have what they need.”

The Wisconsin Republican’s statement came as authorities struggle to provide adequate relief to the more than 3 million U.S. citizens on the island territory, which is without power and has seen terrible devastation.

Ryan said Congress is working with the administration to make sure Puerto Rico gets all of the help that’s required. Lawmakers approved $15 billion in hurricane relief in the wake of Harvey but tens of billions of dollars more is sure to be needed in the weeks and months ahead.

The tragedy has received relatively little media coverage compared to Harvey and Hurricane Irma, and President Donald Trump hasn’t brought much attention to it.

House Speaker Paul Ryan promises that Washington will make sure that the people of hurricane-devastated Puerto Rico will “have what they need.”

The Wisconsin Republican’s statement came as authorities struggle to provide adequate relief to the more than 3 million U.S. citizens on the island territory, which is without power and has seen terrible devastation.

Ryan said Congress is working with the administration to make sure Puerto Rico gets all of the help that’s required. Lawmakers approved $15 billion in hurricane relief in the wake of Harvey but tens of billions of dollars more is sure to be needed in the weeks and months ahead.

The tragedy has received relatively little media coverage compared to Harvey and Hurricane Irma, and President Donald Trump hasn’t brought much attention to it.

September 24

The U.S. Department of Energy says initial damage assessments and power restoration efforts have begun on Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

The agency said Sunday that it is coordinating with the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority, FEMA and a team from the New York Power Authority, including the use of drones and helicopters. Restoration efforts to some critical facilities are underway.

An eight-member team from the Energy Department’s Western Area Power Authority that was deployed to Puerto Rico ahead of the storm and assisted with initial damage assessments has been redeployed to St. Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

The Energy Department says additional DOE responders are prepared to deploy to Puerto Rico and will do so as soon as transportation can be arranged.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Sunday launched a state effort to help hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico.

The Democrat announced the relief effort after visiting the island Friday. It will encourage residents statewide to donate goods and will raise funds from the business community for organizations in Puerto Rico.

It also will include efforts from medical professionals to send health care workers from New York to the island and provide support in getting medicine and medical supplies.

Cuomo was joined by entertainer Jennifer Lopez for the announcement.

Lopez, co-chair of the Empire State Relief & Recovery Effort, urged people to support Puerto Rico, the Caribbean and Mexico with donations and contributions.

“I cannot tell you what it meant to me and to the people of Puerto Rico to see New York not only pledge support but Governor Cuomo to actually show up with resources and supplies,” Lopez said.

Cuomo also made a reference to Republican President Donald Trump’s comments criticizing athletes who protest during the national anthem, saying “instead of arguing with football players … why don’t we put the politics aside and focus on helping Americans in desperate need.”

Hurricane Maria slammed into Puerto Rico on Wednesday with heavy winds and rain, knocking out all power to the island. During his visit, Cuomo said he witnessed “breathtaking” devastation. The week before, Cuomo traveled to the U.S. Virgin Islands following Hurricane Irma.

A New York member of Congress who traveled to Puerto Rico with New York’s governor to assess damage by Hurricane Maria says the U.S. territory and the state are inextricably linked.

Democratic Rep. Nydia Velazquez says: “For New Yorkers, Puerto Ricans are family – for some figuratively and, for many of us, literally. New Yorkers take care of their family.”

She notes Puerto Rico was already struggling from a decade-long economic slump, but now “the island has been dealt a crushing blow and needs all the assistance it can get.”

Velazquez has been named by New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo to co-chair a state effort to support Puerto Rico’s recovery.

She says that she and others in the New York congressional delegation will be advocating for federal funding to swiftly repair and rebuild Puerto Rico’s electrical grid, help small businesses recover and address other problems.

Jennifer Lopez has pledged $1 million toward hurricane relief efforts in her family’s native Puerto Rico.

Lopez announced during a news conference with New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Sunday that she would give money from her ongoing Las Vegas residency to various charities in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria. Lopez says she’s also enlisting the help of her boyfriend, former New York Yankees star Alex Rodriguez, and her ex-husband, Marc Anthony.

The 48-year-old Lopez was born in New York to Puerto Rican parents. She says she still has family on the island that she has yet hear from.

Fellow singer Ricky Martin has donated $100,000 to the relief effort and launched an online fundraiser. Puerto Rican rapper Daddy Yankee is sending four truckloads of supplies donated by his fans.

Puerto Rico’s government says engineers will inspect the Guajataca Dam on Sunday to determine the extent of damage inflicted by Hurricane Maria last week.

The dam was cracked but had not burst by late Saturday. But Public Affairs Secretary Ramon Rosario Rosario said in a statement that the dam’s “fissure was big and it will collapse at any minute.”

Fears that the dam would fail prompted the government to evacuate nearby residents.

The 345-yard (316-meter) dam was built around 1928. It holds back a man-made lake covering about 2 square miles (5 square kilometers).

More than 15 inches (nearly 40 centimeters) of rain from Maria fell on the surrounding mountains.

San Juan’s cruiseship and cargo ports are nearly empty after Hurricane María on Sept. 24. (CB photo)


The Latest: Trump notes Puerto Rico devastation – and debt

The Latest on tropical weather, evacuations and efforts to help hurricane victims (all times local):

September 25

Marc Anthony has some scathing words for Donald Trump, pleading with the president to forget about football and focus instead on hurricane-hammered Puerto Rico.

Anthony tweeted on Monday night: “Mr. President shut the f— up about NFL. Do something about our people in need in #PuertoRico. We are American Citizens too.”

The 49-year-old singer was born in New York, but his parents are from Puerto Rico, which was hit hard by Hurricane Maria.

Trump did tweet about Puerto Rico later Monday night, but dwelled on the island’s “billions of dollars” of debt to “Wall Street and the banks.”

Anthony is one of many entertainers with Puerto Rican roots trying to summon support.

“Hamilton” star Lin-Manuel tweeted that he’s “texting every famous Puerto Rican singer I know and several I don’t.”

President Donald Trump is finally tweeting about Puerto Rico – but his message may not be well-received by residents struggling with the devastation caused by Hurricane Maria.

Trump says in a trio of tweets Monday night that “Puerto Rico, which was already suffering from broken infrastructure & massive debt, is in deep trouble.”

Trump says the island’s electrical system was “devastated” and much of the island “was destroyed.” He’s also noting Puerto Rico owes “billions of dollars” to “Wall Street and the banks” which, he says, “sadly, must be dealt with.”

He says food, water and medicine are top priorities, and adds the words “doing well.”

His administration is facing steep criticism that its response to Hurricane Maria has fallen short.

It’s already been five days with no lights or air conditioning, and Puerto Rico is looking at many, many more. The power is still out on nearly all the island after Hurricane Maria smashed poles, snarled power lines and flooded electricity-generating plants, knocking out a grid that was already considered antiquated compared to the U.S. mainland.

Power had been restored to a handful of hospitals and surrounding areas by Monday afternoon but Public Affairs Secretary Ramon Rosario said it will take months to fully restore power to the island.

Getting the power back isn’t just a matter of comfort. A long delay will mean even more pain for a Puerto Rican economy that’s already reeling from a decade-long recession.

With no power, even more people will leave the island to find better opportunities on the mainland and further drain its workforce. The downed power system is also damaging the tourism industry, which contributed 8 percent to Puerto Rico’s economy last year.

A Pentagon spokesman, Col. Rob Manning, said the Defense Department is working around the clock to deliver humanitarian assistance to Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

The USS Kearsarge has conducted medical evacuations and airlifted relief supplies to Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

On Sunday , the Kearsarge inserted Marine and Navy teams into Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico, to clear main roads and the airfield to enable additional air support to the overall relief effort.

The military also is helping to restore power on Puerto Rico by providing generators and the fuel to run them.

Meanwhile, the Navy has worked with the Coast Guard to reopen the port of San Juan.

Eight Army UH-60 helicopters from Fort Campbell, Kentucky, are also being flown to San Juan international airport to increase the capacity for distributing relief supplies on the island.

And the Army Corps of Engineers has “conducted a preliminary inspection” of a dam in Puerto Rico that has raised concerns in recent days.

The Trump administration says it is not planning to waive federal restrictions on foreign ships’ transportation of cargo to Puerto Rico and other areas affected by Hurricane Maria, as it did following hurricanes Harvey and Irma.

A spokesman for the Department of Homeland Security says officials believe there is sufficient capacity of U.S.-flagged vessels to move goods to Puerto Rico. Spokesman David Lapan said most of the humanitarian shipments to Puerto Rico will be through barges, which make up a significant portion of the U.S.-flagged cargo fleet.

DHS waived Jones Act restrictions during Harvey and Irma in order to move oil more quickly to the East Coast and make up for the loss of pipelines.

New York Rep Nydia Velazquez has asked for a Jones Act waiver for Maria.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo says President Donald Trump should focus more on hurricane recovery and less on football players.

The Democrat told business leaders Monday that the Republican president’s criticism of NFL players who protest during the national anthem is divisive. He said Trump should pay more attention to helping residents in Florida, Texas, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands still reeling from destructive hurricanes.

Following the storms Cuomo visited Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands in a show of solidarity and to better understand how New York can help. The state is sending personnel and supplies such as drinking water and electric generators.

Cuomo has been mentioned as a possible White House contender in 2020. He’s seeking a third term as governor next year.

A New Jersey family is desperately trying to find a way to get an elderly woman stranded in Puerto Rico to the airport to fly out for treatment for carcinoid tumors in her lungs.

Lisa Suhay says she’s been working with Madeline “Sally” Hennessey’s family to try to get her to the airport in time for a humanitarian flight Monday – or on a scheduled Delta flight Thursday .

“From our end, it’s hoping and praying,” said Hennessey’s daughter, Beth O’Brien, of Wall Township, New Jersey. “We’re trying to contact everybody that we can to get her to the airport.”

Hennessey says her 80-year-old mother needs an injection every 28 days and the next one is scheduled for Oct. 13 . The elderly woman also has an oxygen tank, which needs to remain plugged in. The building where the woman is staying is powered by emergency generators, but the family worries about what will happen if that runs out. They say the woman is having a hard time breathing because of the lack of air conditioning.

The Department of Homeland Security says it’s not planning to waive federal restrictions on foreign ships’ transportation of cargo to Puerto Rico and other areas affected by Hurricane Maria, as it did following hurricanes Harvey and Irma.

A Homeland Security spokesman says that, based on consultation with the Energy Department and other federal agencies, officials believe there is sufficient capacity of U.S.-flagged vessels to move goods to Puerto Rico. Spokesman David Lapan said most of the humanitarian shipments to Puerto Rico will be through barges, which make up a significant portion of the US-flagged cargo fleet.

Lapan said officials waived the Jones Act after hurricanes Harvey and Irma in order to move oil to the East Coast. The waiver also helped make up for the loss of high-capacity pipelines.

The chief of police in Dominica says the confirmed death toll has risen to 27 from Hurricane Maria’s strike on the Caribbean island.

Chief Daniel Carbon told reporters Monday that the toll had risen from 15. He said another 27 were missing.

Maria slammed into the small island on Sept. 18 as a Category 5 hurricane, causing devastating damage, before continuing on to hit Puerto Rico.

The top Democrat in the House is calling upon President Donald Trump to deploy the military to help with the humanitarian crisis in Puerto Rico.

The island territory of more than 3 million U.S. citizens is reeling in the devastating wake of Hurricane Maria. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi says Pentagon resources are needed for search-and-rescue operations, maintaining order, and help with transportation.

The California Democrat also said that the people of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands “deserve to know that their government will be there for them, without question or hesitation.”

The devastation in Puerto Rico has received relatively little media coverage compared to Harvey and Hurricane Irma, and President Donald Trump hasn’t brought much attention to it.

House Speaker Paul Ryan promises that Washington will make sure that the people of hurricane-devastated Puerto Rico will “have what they need.”

The Wisconsin Republican’s statement came as authorities struggle to provide adequate relief to the more than 3 million U.S. citizens on the island territory, which is without power and has seen terrible devastation.

Ryan said Congress is working with the administration to make sure Puerto Rico gets all of the help that’s required. Lawmakers approved $15 billion in hurricane relief in the wake of Harvey but tens of billions of dollars more is sure to be needed in the weeks and months ahead.

The tragedy has received relatively little media coverage compared to Harvey and Hurricane Irma, and President Donald Trump hasn’t brought much attention to it.

House Speaker Paul Ryan promises that Washington will make sure that the people of hurricane-devastated Puerto Rico will “have what they need.”

The Wisconsin Republican’s statement came as authorities struggle to provide adequate relief to the more than 3 million U.S. citizens on the island territory, which is without power and has seen terrible devastation.

Ryan said Congress is working with the administration to make sure Puerto Rico gets all of the help that’s required. Lawmakers approved $15 billion in hurricane relief in the wake of Harvey but tens of billions of dollars more is sure to be needed in the weeks and months ahead.

The tragedy has received relatively little media coverage compared to Harvey and Hurricane Irma, and President Donald Trump hasn’t brought much attention to it.

September 24

The U.S. Department of Energy says initial damage assessments and power restoration efforts have begun on Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

The agency said Sunday that it is coordinating with the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority, FEMA and a team from the New York Power Authority, including the use of drones and helicopters. Restoration efforts to some critical facilities are underway.

An eight-member team from the Energy Department’s Western Area Power Authority that was deployed to Puerto Rico ahead of the storm and assisted with initial damage assessments has been redeployed to St. Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

The Energy Department says additional DOE responders are prepared to deploy to Puerto Rico and will do so as soon as transportation can be arranged.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Sunday launched a state effort to help hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico.

The Democrat announced the relief effort after visiting the island Friday. It will encourage residents statewide to donate goods and will raise funds from the business community for organizations in Puerto Rico.

It also will include efforts from medical professionals to send health care workers from New York to the island and provide support in getting medicine and medical supplies.

Cuomo was joined by entertainer Jennifer Lopez for the announcement.

Lopez, co-chair of the Empire State Relief & Recovery Effort, urged people to support Puerto Rico, the Caribbean and Mexico with donations and contributions.

“I cannot tell you what it meant to me and to the people of Puerto Rico to see New York not only pledge support but Governor Cuomo to actually show up with resources and supplies,” Lopez said.

Cuomo also made a reference to Republican President Donald Trump’s comments criticizing athletes who protest during the national anthem, saying “instead of arguing with football players … why don’t we put the politics aside and focus on helping Americans in desperate need.”

Hurricane Maria slammed into Puerto Rico on Wednesday with heavy winds and rain, knocking out all power to the island. During his visit, Cuomo said he witnessed “breathtaking” devastation. The week before, Cuomo traveled to the U.S. Virgin Islands following Hurricane Irma.

A New York member of Congress who traveled to Puerto Rico with New York’s governor to assess damage by Hurricane Maria says the U.S. territory and the state are inextricably linked.

Democratic Rep. Nydia Velazquez says: “For New Yorkers, Puerto Ricans are family – for some figuratively and, for many of us, literally. New Yorkers take care of their family.”

She notes Puerto Rico was already struggling from a decade-long economic slump, but now “the island has been dealt a crushing blow and needs all the assistance it can get.”

Velazquez has been named by New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo to co-chair a state effort to support Puerto Rico’s recovery.

She says that she and others in the New York congressional delegation will be advocating for federal funding to swiftly repair and rebuild Puerto Rico’s electrical grid, help small businesses recover and address other problems.

Jennifer Lopez has pledged $1 million toward hurricane relief efforts in her family’s native Puerto Rico.

Lopez announced during a news conference with New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Sunday that she would give money from her ongoing Las Vegas residency to various charities in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria. Lopez says she’s also enlisting the help of her boyfriend, former New York Yankees star Alex Rodriguez, and her ex-husband, Marc Anthony.

The 48-year-old Lopez was born in New York to Puerto Rican parents. She says she still has family on the island that she has yet hear from.

Fellow singer Ricky Martin has donated $100,000 to the relief effort and launched an online fundraiser. Puerto Rican rapper Daddy Yankee is sending four truckloads of supplies donated by his fans.

Puerto Rico’s government says engineers will inspect the Guajataca Dam on Sunday to determine the extent of damage inflicted by Hurricane Maria last week.

The dam was cracked but had not burst by late Saturday. But Public Affairs Secretary Ramon Rosario Rosario said in a statement that the dam’s “fissure was big and it will collapse at any minute.”

Fears that the dam would fail prompted the government to evacuate nearby residents.

The 345-yard (316-meter) dam was built around 1928. It holds back a man-made lake covering about 2 square miles (5 square kilometers).

More than 15 inches (nearly 40 centimeters) of rain from Maria fell on the surrounding mountains.

San Juan’s cruiseship and cargo ports are nearly empty after Hurricane María on Sept. 24. (CB photo)


The Latest: Trump notes Puerto Rico devastation – and debt

The Latest on tropical weather, evacuations and efforts to help hurricane victims (all times local):

September 25

Marc Anthony has some scathing words for Donald Trump, pleading with the president to forget about football and focus instead on hurricane-hammered Puerto Rico.

Anthony tweeted on Monday night: “Mr. President shut the f— up about NFL. Do something about our people in need in #PuertoRico. We are American Citizens too.”

The 49-year-old singer was born in New York, but his parents are from Puerto Rico, which was hit hard by Hurricane Maria.

Trump did tweet about Puerto Rico later Monday night, but dwelled on the island’s “billions of dollars” of debt to “Wall Street and the banks.”

Anthony is one of many entertainers with Puerto Rican roots trying to summon support.

“Hamilton” star Lin-Manuel tweeted that he’s “texting every famous Puerto Rican singer I know and several I don’t.”

President Donald Trump is finally tweeting about Puerto Rico – but his message may not be well-received by residents struggling with the devastation caused by Hurricane Maria.

Trump says in a trio of tweets Monday night that “Puerto Rico, which was already suffering from broken infrastructure & massive debt, is in deep trouble.”

Trump says the island’s electrical system was “devastated” and much of the island “was destroyed.” He’s also noting Puerto Rico owes “billions of dollars” to “Wall Street and the banks” which, he says, “sadly, must be dealt with.”

He says food, water and medicine are top priorities, and adds the words “doing well.”

His administration is facing steep criticism that its response to Hurricane Maria has fallen short.

It’s already been five days with no lights or air conditioning, and Puerto Rico is looking at many, many more. The power is still out on nearly all the island after Hurricane Maria smashed poles, snarled power lines and flooded electricity-generating plants, knocking out a grid that was already considered antiquated compared to the U.S. mainland.

Power had been restored to a handful of hospitals and surrounding areas by Monday afternoon but Public Affairs Secretary Ramon Rosario said it will take months to fully restore power to the island.

Getting the power back isn’t just a matter of comfort. A long delay will mean even more pain for a Puerto Rican economy that’s already reeling from a decade-long recession.

With no power, even more people will leave the island to find better opportunities on the mainland and further drain its workforce. The downed power system is also damaging the tourism industry, which contributed 8 percent to Puerto Rico’s economy last year.

A Pentagon spokesman, Col. Rob Manning, said the Defense Department is working around the clock to deliver humanitarian assistance to Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

The USS Kearsarge has conducted medical evacuations and airlifted relief supplies to Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

On Sunday , the Kearsarge inserted Marine and Navy teams into Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico, to clear main roads and the airfield to enable additional air support to the overall relief effort.

The military also is helping to restore power on Puerto Rico by providing generators and the fuel to run them.

Meanwhile, the Navy has worked with the Coast Guard to reopen the port of San Juan.

Eight Army UH-60 helicopters from Fort Campbell, Kentucky, are also being flown to San Juan international airport to increase the capacity for distributing relief supplies on the island.

And the Army Corps of Engineers has “conducted a preliminary inspection” of a dam in Puerto Rico that has raised concerns in recent days.

The Trump administration says it is not planning to waive federal restrictions on foreign ships’ transportation of cargo to Puerto Rico and other areas affected by Hurricane Maria, as it did following hurricanes Harvey and Irma.

A spokesman for the Department of Homeland Security says officials believe there is sufficient capacity of U.S.-flagged vessels to move goods to Puerto Rico. Spokesman David Lapan said most of the humanitarian shipments to Puerto Rico will be through barges, which make up a significant portion of the U.S.-flagged cargo fleet.

DHS waived Jones Act restrictions during Harvey and Irma in order to move oil more quickly to the East Coast and make up for the loss of pipelines.

New York Rep Nydia Velazquez has asked for a Jones Act waiver for Maria.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo says President Donald Trump should focus more on hurricane recovery and less on football players.

The Democrat told business leaders Monday that the Republican president’s criticism of NFL players who protest during the national anthem is divisive. He said Trump should pay more attention to helping residents in Florida, Texas, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands still reeling from destructive hurricanes.

Following the storms Cuomo visited Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands in a show of solidarity and to better understand how New York can help. The state is sending personnel and supplies such as drinking water and electric generators.

Cuomo has been mentioned as a possible White House contender in 2020. He’s seeking a third term as governor next year.

A New Jersey family is desperately trying to find a way to get an elderly woman stranded in Puerto Rico to the airport to fly out for treatment for carcinoid tumors in her lungs.

Lisa Suhay says she’s been working with Madeline “Sally” Hennessey’s family to try to get her to the airport in time for a humanitarian flight Monday – or on a scheduled Delta flight Thursday .

“From our end, it’s hoping and praying,” said Hennessey’s daughter, Beth O’Brien, of Wall Township, New Jersey. “We’re trying to contact everybody that we can to get her to the airport.”

Hennessey says her 80-year-old mother needs an injection every 28 days and the next one is scheduled for Oct. 13 . The elderly woman also has an oxygen tank, which needs to remain plugged in. The building where the woman is staying is powered by emergency generators, but the family worries about what will happen if that runs out. They say the woman is having a hard time breathing because of the lack of air conditioning.

The Department of Homeland Security says it’s not planning to waive federal restrictions on foreign ships’ transportation of cargo to Puerto Rico and other areas affected by Hurricane Maria, as it did following hurricanes Harvey and Irma.

A Homeland Security spokesman says that, based on consultation with the Energy Department and other federal agencies, officials believe there is sufficient capacity of U.S.-flagged vessels to move goods to Puerto Rico. Spokesman David Lapan said most of the humanitarian shipments to Puerto Rico will be through barges, which make up a significant portion of the US-flagged cargo fleet.

Lapan said officials waived the Jones Act after hurricanes Harvey and Irma in order to move oil to the East Coast. The waiver also helped make up for the loss of high-capacity pipelines.

The chief of police in Dominica says the confirmed death toll has risen to 27 from Hurricane Maria’s strike on the Caribbean island.

Chief Daniel Carbon told reporters Monday that the toll had risen from 15. He said another 27 were missing.

Maria slammed into the small island on Sept. 18 as a Category 5 hurricane, causing devastating damage, before continuing on to hit Puerto Rico.

The top Democrat in the House is calling upon President Donald Trump to deploy the military to help with the humanitarian crisis in Puerto Rico.

The island territory of more than 3 million U.S. citizens is reeling in the devastating wake of Hurricane Maria. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi says Pentagon resources are needed for search-and-rescue operations, maintaining order, and help with transportation.

The California Democrat also said that the people of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands “deserve to know that their government will be there for them, without question or hesitation.”

The devastation in Puerto Rico has received relatively little media coverage compared to Harvey and Hurricane Irma, and President Donald Trump hasn’t brought much attention to it.

House Speaker Paul Ryan promises that Washington will make sure that the people of hurricane-devastated Puerto Rico will “have what they need.”

The Wisconsin Republican’s statement came as authorities struggle to provide adequate relief to the more than 3 million U.S. citizens on the island territory, which is without power and has seen terrible devastation.

Ryan said Congress is working with the administration to make sure Puerto Rico gets all of the help that’s required. Lawmakers approved $15 billion in hurricane relief in the wake of Harvey but tens of billions of dollars more is sure to be needed in the weeks and months ahead.

The tragedy has received relatively little media coverage compared to Harvey and Hurricane Irma, and President Donald Trump hasn’t brought much attention to it.

House Speaker Paul Ryan promises that Washington will make sure that the people of hurricane-devastated Puerto Rico will “have what they need.”

The Wisconsin Republican’s statement came as authorities struggle to provide adequate relief to the more than 3 million U.S. citizens on the island territory, which is without power and has seen terrible devastation.

Ryan said Congress is working with the administration to make sure Puerto Rico gets all of the help that’s required. Lawmakers approved $15 billion in hurricane relief in the wake of Harvey but tens of billions of dollars more is sure to be needed in the weeks and months ahead.

The tragedy has received relatively little media coverage compared to Harvey and Hurricane Irma, and President Donald Trump hasn’t brought much attention to it.

September 24

The U.S. Department of Energy says initial damage assessments and power restoration efforts have begun on Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

The agency said Sunday that it is coordinating with the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority, FEMA and a team from the New York Power Authority, including the use of drones and helicopters. Restoration efforts to some critical facilities are underway.

An eight-member team from the Energy Department’s Western Area Power Authority that was deployed to Puerto Rico ahead of the storm and assisted with initial damage assessments has been redeployed to St. Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

The Energy Department says additional DOE responders are prepared to deploy to Puerto Rico and will do so as soon as transportation can be arranged.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Sunday launched a state effort to help hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico.

The Democrat announced the relief effort after visiting the island Friday. It will encourage residents statewide to donate goods and will raise funds from the business community for organizations in Puerto Rico.

It also will include efforts from medical professionals to send health care workers from New York to the island and provide support in getting medicine and medical supplies.

Cuomo was joined by entertainer Jennifer Lopez for the announcement.

Lopez, co-chair of the Empire State Relief & Recovery Effort, urged people to support Puerto Rico, the Caribbean and Mexico with donations and contributions.

“I cannot tell you what it meant to me and to the people of Puerto Rico to see New York not only pledge support but Governor Cuomo to actually show up with resources and supplies,” Lopez said.

Cuomo also made a reference to Republican President Donald Trump’s comments criticizing athletes who protest during the national anthem, saying “instead of arguing with football players … why don’t we put the politics aside and focus on helping Americans in desperate need.”

Hurricane Maria slammed into Puerto Rico on Wednesday with heavy winds and rain, knocking out all power to the island. During his visit, Cuomo said he witnessed “breathtaking” devastation. The week before, Cuomo traveled to the U.S. Virgin Islands following Hurricane Irma.

A New York member of Congress who traveled to Puerto Rico with New York’s governor to assess damage by Hurricane Maria says the U.S. territory and the state are inextricably linked.

Democratic Rep. Nydia Velazquez says: “For New Yorkers, Puerto Ricans are family – for some figuratively and, for many of us, literally. New Yorkers take care of their family.”

She notes Puerto Rico was already struggling from a decade-long economic slump, but now “the island has been dealt a crushing blow and needs all the assistance it can get.”

Velazquez has been named by New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo to co-chair a state effort to support Puerto Rico’s recovery.

She says that she and others in the New York congressional delegation will be advocating for federal funding to swiftly repair and rebuild Puerto Rico’s electrical grid, help small businesses recover and address other problems.

Jennifer Lopez has pledged $1 million toward hurricane relief efforts in her family’s native Puerto Rico.

Lopez announced during a news conference with New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Sunday that she would give money from her ongoing Las Vegas residency to various charities in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria. Lopez says she’s also enlisting the help of her boyfriend, former New York Yankees star Alex Rodriguez, and her ex-husband, Marc Anthony.

The 48-year-old Lopez was born in New York to Puerto Rican parents. She says she still has family on the island that she has yet hear from.

Fellow singer Ricky Martin has donated $100,000 to the relief effort and launched an online fundraiser. Puerto Rican rapper Daddy Yankee is sending four truckloads of supplies donated by his fans.

Puerto Rico’s government says engineers will inspect the Guajataca Dam on Sunday to determine the extent of damage inflicted by Hurricane Maria last week.

The dam was cracked but had not burst by late Saturday. But Public Affairs Secretary Ramon Rosario Rosario said in a statement that the dam’s “fissure was big and it will collapse at any minute.”

Fears that the dam would fail prompted the government to evacuate nearby residents.

The 345-yard (316-meter) dam was built around 1928. It holds back a man-made lake covering about 2 square miles (5 square kilometers).

More than 15 inches (nearly 40 centimeters) of rain from Maria fell on the surrounding mountains.

San Juan’s cruiseship and cargo ports are nearly empty after Hurricane María on Sept. 24. (CB photo)


The Latest: Trump notes Puerto Rico devastation – and debt

The Latest on tropical weather, evacuations and efforts to help hurricane victims (all times local):

September 25

Marc Anthony has some scathing words for Donald Trump, pleading with the president to forget about football and focus instead on hurricane-hammered Puerto Rico.

Anthony tweeted on Monday night: “Mr. President shut the f— up about NFL. Do something about our people in need in #PuertoRico. We are American Citizens too.”

The 49-year-old singer was born in New York, but his parents are from Puerto Rico, which was hit hard by Hurricane Maria.

Trump did tweet about Puerto Rico later Monday night, but dwelled on the island’s “billions of dollars” of debt to “Wall Street and the banks.”

Anthony is one of many entertainers with Puerto Rican roots trying to summon support.

“Hamilton” star Lin-Manuel tweeted that he’s “texting every famous Puerto Rican singer I know and several I don’t.”

President Donald Trump is finally tweeting about Puerto Rico – but his message may not be well-received by residents struggling with the devastation caused by Hurricane Maria.

Trump says in a trio of tweets Monday night that “Puerto Rico, which was already suffering from broken infrastructure & massive debt, is in deep trouble.”

Trump says the island’s electrical system was “devastated” and much of the island “was destroyed.” He’s also noting Puerto Rico owes “billions of dollars” to “Wall Street and the banks” which, he says, “sadly, must be dealt with.”

He says food, water and medicine are top priorities, and adds the words “doing well.”

His administration is facing steep criticism that its response to Hurricane Maria has fallen short.

It’s already been five days with no lights or air conditioning, and Puerto Rico is looking at many, many more. The power is still out on nearly all the island after Hurricane Maria smashed poles, snarled power lines and flooded electricity-generating plants, knocking out a grid that was already considered antiquated compared to the U.S. mainland.

Power had been restored to a handful of hospitals and surrounding areas by Monday afternoon but Public Affairs Secretary Ramon Rosario said it will take months to fully restore power to the island.

Getting the power back isn’t just a matter of comfort. A long delay will mean even more pain for a Puerto Rican economy that’s already reeling from a decade-long recession.

With no power, even more people will leave the island to find better opportunities on the mainland and further drain its workforce. The downed power system is also damaging the tourism industry, which contributed 8 percent to Puerto Rico’s economy last year.

A Pentagon spokesman, Col. Rob Manning, said the Defense Department is working around the clock to deliver humanitarian assistance to Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

The USS Kearsarge has conducted medical evacuations and airlifted relief supplies to Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

On Sunday , the Kearsarge inserted Marine and Navy teams into Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico, to clear main roads and the airfield to enable additional air support to the overall relief effort.

The military also is helping to restore power on Puerto Rico by providing generators and the fuel to run them.

Meanwhile, the Navy has worked with the Coast Guard to reopen the port of San Juan.

Eight Army UH-60 helicopters from Fort Campbell, Kentucky, are also being flown to San Juan international airport to increase the capacity for distributing relief supplies on the island.

And the Army Corps of Engineers has “conducted a preliminary inspection” of a dam in Puerto Rico that has raised concerns in recent days.

The Trump administration says it is not planning to waive federal restrictions on foreign ships’ transportation of cargo to Puerto Rico and other areas affected by Hurricane Maria, as it did following hurricanes Harvey and Irma.

A spokesman for the Department of Homeland Security says officials believe there is sufficient capacity of U.S.-flagged vessels to move goods to Puerto Rico. Spokesman David Lapan said most of the humanitarian shipments to Puerto Rico will be through barges, which make up a significant portion of the U.S.-flagged cargo fleet.

DHS waived Jones Act restrictions during Harvey and Irma in order to move oil more quickly to the East Coast and make up for the loss of pipelines.

New York Rep Nydia Velazquez has asked for a Jones Act waiver for Maria.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo says President Donald Trump should focus more on hurricane recovery and less on football players.

The Democrat told business leaders Monday that the Republican president’s criticism of NFL players who protest during the national anthem is divisive. He said Trump should pay more attention to helping residents in Florida, Texas, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands still reeling from destructive hurricanes.

Following the storms Cuomo visited Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands in a show of solidarity and to better understand how New York can help. The state is sending personnel and supplies such as drinking water and electric generators.

Cuomo has been mentioned as a possible White House contender in 2020. He’s seeking a third term as governor next year.

A New Jersey family is desperately trying to find a way to get an elderly woman stranded in Puerto Rico to the airport to fly out for treatment for carcinoid tumors in her lungs.

Lisa Suhay says she’s been working with Madeline “Sally” Hennessey’s family to try to get her to the airport in time for a humanitarian flight Monday – or on a scheduled Delta flight Thursday .

“From our end, it’s hoping and praying,” said Hennessey’s daughter, Beth O’Brien, of Wall Township, New Jersey. “We’re trying to contact everybody that we can to get her to the airport.”

Hennessey says her 80-year-old mother needs an injection every 28 days and the next one is scheduled for Oct. 13 . The elderly woman also has an oxygen tank, which needs to remain plugged in. The building where the woman is staying is powered by emergency generators, but the family worries about what will happen if that runs out. They say the woman is having a hard time breathing because of the lack of air conditioning.

The Department of Homeland Security says it’s not planning to waive federal restrictions on foreign ships’ transportation of cargo to Puerto Rico and other areas affected by Hurricane Maria, as it did following hurricanes Harvey and Irma.

A Homeland Security spokesman says that, based on consultation with the Energy Department and other federal agencies, officials believe there is sufficient capacity of U.S.-flagged vessels to move goods to Puerto Rico. Spokesman David Lapan said most of the humanitarian shipments to Puerto Rico will be through barges, which make up a significant portion of the US-flagged cargo fleet.

Lapan said officials waived the Jones Act after hurricanes Harvey and Irma in order to move oil to the East Coast. The waiver also helped make up for the loss of high-capacity pipelines.

The chief of police in Dominica says the confirmed death toll has risen to 27 from Hurricane Maria’s strike on the Caribbean island.

Chief Daniel Carbon told reporters Monday that the toll had risen from 15. He said another 27 were missing.

Maria slammed into the small island on Sept. 18 as a Category 5 hurricane, causing devastating damage, before continuing on to hit Puerto Rico.

The top Democrat in the House is calling upon President Donald Trump to deploy the military to help with the humanitarian crisis in Puerto Rico.

The island territory of more than 3 million U.S. citizens is reeling in the devastating wake of Hurricane Maria. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi says Pentagon resources are needed for search-and-rescue operations, maintaining order, and help with transportation.

The California Democrat also said that the people of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands “deserve to know that their government will be there for them, without question or hesitation.”

The devastation in Puerto Rico has received relatively little media coverage compared to Harvey and Hurricane Irma, and President Donald Trump hasn’t brought much attention to it.

House Speaker Paul Ryan promises that Washington will make sure that the people of hurricane-devastated Puerto Rico will “have what they need.”

The Wisconsin Republican’s statement came as authorities struggle to provide adequate relief to the more than 3 million U.S. citizens on the island territory, which is without power and has seen terrible devastation.

Ryan said Congress is working with the administration to make sure Puerto Rico gets all of the help that’s required. Lawmakers approved $15 billion in hurricane relief in the wake of Harvey but tens of billions of dollars more is sure to be needed in the weeks and months ahead.

The tragedy has received relatively little media coverage compared to Harvey and Hurricane Irma, and President Donald Trump hasn’t brought much attention to it.

House Speaker Paul Ryan promises that Washington will make sure that the people of hurricane-devastated Puerto Rico will “have what they need.”

The Wisconsin Republican’s statement came as authorities struggle to provide adequate relief to the more than 3 million U.S. citizens on the island territory, which is without power and has seen terrible devastation.

Ryan said Congress is working with the administration to make sure Puerto Rico gets all of the help that’s required. Lawmakers approved $15 billion in hurricane relief in the wake of Harvey but tens of billions of dollars more is sure to be needed in the weeks and months ahead.

The tragedy has received relatively little media coverage compared to Harvey and Hurricane Irma, and President Donald Trump hasn’t brought much attention to it.

September 24

The U.S. Department of Energy says initial damage assessments and power restoration efforts have begun on Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

The agency said Sunday that it is coordinating with the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority, FEMA and a team from the New York Power Authority, including the use of drones and helicopters. Restoration efforts to some critical facilities are underway.

An eight-member team from the Energy Department’s Western Area Power Authority that was deployed to Puerto Rico ahead of the storm and assisted with initial damage assessments has been redeployed to St. Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

The Energy Department says additional DOE responders are prepared to deploy to Puerto Rico and will do so as soon as transportation can be arranged.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Sunday launched a state effort to help hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico.

The Democrat announced the relief effort after visiting the island Friday. It will encourage residents statewide to donate goods and will raise funds from the business community for organizations in Puerto Rico.

It also will include efforts from medical professionals to send health care workers from New York to the island and provide support in getting medicine and medical supplies.

Cuomo was joined by entertainer Jennifer Lopez for the announcement.

Lopez, co-chair of the Empire State Relief & Recovery Effort, urged people to support Puerto Rico, the Caribbean and Mexico with donations and contributions.

“I cannot tell you what it meant to me and to the people of Puerto Rico to see New York not only pledge support but Governor Cuomo to actually show up with resources and supplies,” Lopez said.

Cuomo also made a reference to Republican President Donald Trump’s comments criticizing athletes who protest during the national anthem, saying “instead of arguing with football players … why don’t we put the politics aside and focus on helping Americans in desperate need.”

Hurricane Maria slammed into Puerto Rico on Wednesday with heavy winds and rain, knocking out all power to the island. During his visit, Cuomo said he witnessed “breathtaking” devastation. The week before, Cuomo traveled to the U.S. Virgin Islands following Hurricane Irma.

A New York member of Congress who traveled to Puerto Rico with New York’s governor to assess damage by Hurricane Maria says the U.S. territory and the state are inextricably linked.

Democratic Rep. Nydia Velazquez says: “For New Yorkers, Puerto Ricans are family – for some figuratively and, for many of us, literally. New Yorkers take care of their family.”

She notes Puerto Rico was already struggling from a decade-long economic slump, but now “the island has been dealt a crushing blow and needs all the assistance it can get.”

Velazquez has been named by New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo to co-chair a state effort to support Puerto Rico’s recovery.

She says that she and others in the New York congressional delegation will be advocating for federal funding to swiftly repair and rebuild Puerto Rico’s electrical grid, help small businesses recover and address other problems.

Jennifer Lopez has pledged $1 million toward hurricane relief efforts in her family’s native Puerto Rico.

Lopez announced during a news conference with New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Sunday that she would give money from her ongoing Las Vegas residency to various charities in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria. Lopez says she’s also enlisting the help of her boyfriend, former New York Yankees star Alex Rodriguez, and her ex-husband, Marc Anthony.

The 48-year-old Lopez was born in New York to Puerto Rican parents. She says she still has family on the island that she has yet hear from.

Fellow singer Ricky Martin has donated $100,000 to the relief effort and launched an online fundraiser. Puerto Rican rapper Daddy Yankee is sending four truckloads of supplies donated by his fans.

Puerto Rico’s government says engineers will inspect the Guajataca Dam on Sunday to determine the extent of damage inflicted by Hurricane Maria last week.

The dam was cracked but had not burst by late Saturday. But Public Affairs Secretary Ramon Rosario Rosario said in a statement that the dam’s “fissure was big and it will collapse at any minute.”

Fears that the dam would fail prompted the government to evacuate nearby residents.

The 345-yard (316-meter) dam was built around 1928. It holds back a man-made lake covering about 2 square miles (5 square kilometers).

More than 15 inches (nearly 40 centimeters) of rain from Maria fell on the surrounding mountains.

San Juan’s cruiseship and cargo ports are nearly empty after Hurricane María on Sept. 24. (CB photo)


The Latest: Trump notes Puerto Rico devastation – and debt

The Latest on tropical weather, evacuations and efforts to help hurricane victims (all times local):

September 25

Marc Anthony has some scathing words for Donald Trump, pleading with the president to forget about football and focus instead on hurricane-hammered Puerto Rico.

Anthony tweeted on Monday night: “Mr. President shut the f— up about NFL. Do something about our people in need in #PuertoRico. We are American Citizens too.”

The 49-year-old singer was born in New York, but his parents are from Puerto Rico, which was hit hard by Hurricane Maria.

Trump did tweet about Puerto Rico later Monday night, but dwelled on the island’s “billions of dollars” of debt to “Wall Street and the banks.”

Anthony is one of many entertainers with Puerto Rican roots trying to summon support.

“Hamilton” star Lin-Manuel tweeted that he’s “texting every famous Puerto Rican singer I know and several I don’t.”

President Donald Trump is finally tweeting about Puerto Rico – but his message may not be well-received by residents struggling with the devastation caused by Hurricane Maria.

Trump says in a trio of tweets Monday night that “Puerto Rico, which was already suffering from broken infrastructure & massive debt, is in deep trouble.”

Trump says the island’s electrical system was “devastated” and much of the island “was destroyed.” He’s also noting Puerto Rico owes “billions of dollars” to “Wall Street and the banks” which, he says, “sadly, must be dealt with.”

He says food, water and medicine are top priorities, and adds the words “doing well.”

His administration is facing steep criticism that its response to Hurricane Maria has fallen short.

It’s already been five days with no lights or air conditioning, and Puerto Rico is looking at many, many more. The power is still out on nearly all the island after Hurricane Maria smashed poles, snarled power lines and flooded electricity-generating plants, knocking out a grid that was already considered antiquated compared to the U.S. mainland.

Power had been restored to a handful of hospitals and surrounding areas by Monday afternoon but Public Affairs Secretary Ramon Rosario said it will take months to fully restore power to the island.

Getting the power back isn’t just a matter of comfort. A long delay will mean even more pain for a Puerto Rican economy that’s already reeling from a decade-long recession.

With no power, even more people will leave the island to find better opportunities on the mainland and further drain its workforce. The downed power system is also damaging the tourism industry, which contributed 8 percent to Puerto Rico’s economy last year.

A Pentagon spokesman, Col. Rob Manning, said the Defense Department is working around the clock to deliver humanitarian assistance to Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

The USS Kearsarge has conducted medical evacuations and airlifted relief supplies to Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

On Sunday , the Kearsarge inserted Marine and Navy teams into Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico, to clear main roads and the airfield to enable additional air support to the overall relief effort.

The military also is helping to restore power on Puerto Rico by providing generators and the fuel to run them.

Meanwhile, the Navy has worked with the Coast Guard to reopen the port of San Juan.

Eight Army UH-60 helicopters from Fort Campbell, Kentucky, are also being flown to San Juan international airport to increase the capacity for distributing relief supplies on the island.

And the Army Corps of Engineers has “conducted a preliminary inspection” of a dam in Puerto Rico that has raised concerns in recent days.

The Trump administration says it is not planning to waive federal restrictions on foreign ships’ transportation of cargo to Puerto Rico and other areas affected by Hurricane Maria, as it did following hurricanes Harvey and Irma.

A spokesman for the Department of Homeland Security says officials believe there is sufficient capacity of U.S.-flagged vessels to move goods to Puerto Rico. Spokesman David Lapan said most of the humanitarian shipments to Puerto Rico will be through barges, which make up a significant portion of the U.S.-flagged cargo fleet.

DHS waived Jones Act restrictions during Harvey and Irma in order to move oil more quickly to the East Coast and make up for the loss of pipelines.

New York Rep Nydia Velazquez has asked for a Jones Act waiver for Maria.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo says President Donald Trump should focus more on hurricane recovery and less on football players.

The Democrat told business leaders Monday that the Republican president’s criticism of NFL players who protest during the national anthem is divisive. He said Trump should pay more attention to helping residents in Florida, Texas, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands still reeling from destructive hurricanes.

Following the storms Cuomo visited Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands in a show of solidarity and to better understand how New York can help. The state is sending personnel and supplies such as drinking water and electric generators.

Cuomo has been mentioned as a possible White House contender in 2020. He’s seeking a third term as governor next year.

A New Jersey family is desperately trying to find a way to get an elderly woman stranded in Puerto Rico to the airport to fly out for treatment for carcinoid tumors in her lungs.

Lisa Suhay says she’s been working with Madeline “Sally” Hennessey’s family to try to get her to the airport in time for a humanitarian flight Monday – or on a scheduled Delta flight Thursday .

“From our end, it’s hoping and praying,” said Hennessey’s daughter, Beth O’Brien, of Wall Township, New Jersey. “We’re trying to contact everybody that we can to get her to the airport.”

Hennessey says her 80-year-old mother needs an injection every 28 days and the next one is scheduled for Oct. 13 . The elderly woman also has an oxygen tank, which needs to remain plugged in. The building where the woman is staying is powered by emergency generators, but the family worries about what will happen if that runs out. They say the woman is having a hard time breathing because of the lack of air conditioning.

The Department of Homeland Security says it’s not planning to waive federal restrictions on foreign ships’ transportation of cargo to Puerto Rico and other areas affected by Hurricane Maria, as it did following hurricanes Harvey and Irma.

A Homeland Security spokesman says that, based on consultation with the Energy Department and other federal agencies, officials believe there is sufficient capacity of U.S.-flagged vessels to move goods to Puerto Rico. Spokesman David Lapan said most of the humanitarian shipments to Puerto Rico will be through barges, which make up a significant portion of the US-flagged cargo fleet.

Lapan said officials waived the Jones Act after hurricanes Harvey and Irma in order to move oil to the East Coast. The waiver also helped make up for the loss of high-capacity pipelines.

The chief of police in Dominica says the confirmed death toll has risen to 27 from Hurricane Maria’s strike on the Caribbean island.

Chief Daniel Carbon told reporters Monday that the toll had risen from 15. He said another 27 were missing.

Maria slammed into the small island on Sept. 18 as a Category 5 hurricane, causing devastating damage, before continuing on to hit Puerto Rico.

The top Democrat in the House is calling upon President Donald Trump to deploy the military to help with the humanitarian crisis in Puerto Rico.

The island territory of more than 3 million U.S. citizens is reeling in the devastating wake of Hurricane Maria. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi says Pentagon resources are needed for search-and-rescue operations, maintaining order, and help with transportation.

The California Democrat also said that the people of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands “deserve to know that their government will be there for them, without question or hesitation.”

The devastation in Puerto Rico has received relatively little media coverage compared to Harvey and Hurricane Irma, and President Donald Trump hasn’t brought much attention to it.

House Speaker Paul Ryan promises that Washington will make sure that the people of hurricane-devastated Puerto Rico will “have what they need.”

The Wisconsin Republican’s statement came as authorities struggle to provide adequate relief to the more than 3 million U.S. citizens on the island territory, which is without power and has seen terrible devastation.

Ryan said Congress is working with the administration to make sure Puerto Rico gets all of the help that’s required. Lawmakers approved $15 billion in hurricane relief in the wake of Harvey but tens of billions of dollars more is sure to be needed in the weeks and months ahead.

The tragedy has received relatively little media coverage compared to Harvey and Hurricane Irma, and President Donald Trump hasn’t brought much attention to it.

House Speaker Paul Ryan promises that Washington will make sure that the people of hurricane-devastated Puerto Rico will “have what they need.”

The Wisconsin Republican’s statement came as authorities struggle to provide adequate relief to the more than 3 million U.S. citizens on the island territory, which is without power and has seen terrible devastation.

Ryan said Congress is working with the administration to make sure Puerto Rico gets all of the help that’s required. Lawmakers approved $15 billion in hurricane relief in the wake of Harvey but tens of billions of dollars more is sure to be needed in the weeks and months ahead.

The tragedy has received relatively little media coverage compared to Harvey and Hurricane Irma, and President Donald Trump hasn’t brought much attention to it.

September 24

The U.S. Department of Energy says initial damage assessments and power restoration efforts have begun on Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

The agency said Sunday that it is coordinating with the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority, FEMA and a team from the New York Power Authority, including the use of drones and helicopters. Restoration efforts to some critical facilities are underway.

An eight-member team from the Energy Department’s Western Area Power Authority that was deployed to Puerto Rico ahead of the storm and assisted with initial damage assessments has been redeployed to St. Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

The Energy Department says additional DOE responders are prepared to deploy to Puerto Rico and will do so as soon as transportation can be arranged.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Sunday launched a state effort to help hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico.

The Democrat announced the relief effort after visiting the island Friday. It will encourage residents statewide to donate goods and will raise funds from the business community for organizations in Puerto Rico.

It also will include efforts from medical professionals to send health care workers from New York to the island and provide support in getting medicine and medical supplies.

Cuomo was joined by entertainer Jennifer Lopez for the announcement.

Lopez, co-chair of the Empire State Relief & Recovery Effort, urged people to support Puerto Rico, the Caribbean and Mexico with donations and contributions.

“I cannot tell you what it meant to me and to the people of Puerto Rico to see New York not only pledge support but Governor Cuomo to actually show up with resources and supplies,” Lopez said.

Cuomo also made a reference to Republican President Donald Trump’s comments criticizing athletes who protest during the national anthem, saying “instead of arguing with football players … why don’t we put the politics aside and focus on helping Americans in desperate need.”

Hurricane Maria slammed into Puerto Rico on Wednesday with heavy winds and rain, knocking out all power to the island. During his visit, Cuomo said he witnessed “breathtaking” devastation. The week before, Cuomo traveled to the U.S. Virgin Islands following Hurricane Irma.

A New York member of Congress who traveled to Puerto Rico with New York’s governor to assess damage by Hurricane Maria says the U.S. territory and the state are inextricably linked.

Democratic Rep. Nydia Velazquez says: “For New Yorkers, Puerto Ricans are family – for some figuratively and, for many of us, literally. New Yorkers take care of their family.”

She notes Puerto Rico was already struggling from a decade-long economic slump, but now “the island has been dealt a crushing blow and needs all the assistance it can get.”

Velazquez has been named by New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo to co-chair a state effort to support Puerto Rico’s recovery.

She says that she and others in the New York congressional delegation will be advocating for federal funding to swiftly repair and rebuild Puerto Rico’s electrical grid, help small businesses recover and address other problems.

Jennifer Lopez has pledged $1 million toward hurricane relief efforts in her family’s native Puerto Rico.

Lopez announced during a news conference with New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Sunday that she would give money from her ongoing Las Vegas residency to various charities in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria. Lopez says she’s also enlisting the help of her boyfriend, former New York Yankees star Alex Rodriguez, and her ex-husband, Marc Anthony.

The 48-year-old Lopez was born in New York to Puerto Rican parents. She says she still has family on the island that she has yet hear from.

Fellow singer Ricky Martin has donated $100,000 to the relief effort and launched an online fundraiser. Puerto Rican rapper Daddy Yankee is sending four truckloads of supplies donated by his fans.

Puerto Rico’s government says engineers will inspect the Guajataca Dam on Sunday to determine the extent of damage inflicted by Hurricane Maria last week.

The dam was cracked but had not burst by late Saturday. But Public Affairs Secretary Ramon Rosario Rosario said in a statement that the dam’s “fissure was big and it will collapse at any minute.”

Fears that the dam would fail prompted the government to evacuate nearby residents.

The 345-yard (316-meter) dam was built around 1928. It holds back a man-made lake covering about 2 square miles (5 square kilometers).

More than 15 inches (nearly 40 centimeters) of rain from Maria fell on the surrounding mountains.

San Juan’s cruiseship and cargo ports are nearly empty after Hurricane María on Sept. 24. (CB photo)


The Latest: Trump notes Puerto Rico devastation – and debt

The Latest on tropical weather, evacuations and efforts to help hurricane victims (all times local):

September 25

Marc Anthony has some scathing words for Donald Trump, pleading with the president to forget about football and focus instead on hurricane-hammered Puerto Rico.

Anthony tweeted on Monday night: “Mr. President shut the f— up about NFL. Do something about our people in need in #PuertoRico. We are American Citizens too.”

The 49-year-old singer was born in New York, but his parents are from Puerto Rico, which was hit hard by Hurricane Maria.

Trump did tweet about Puerto Rico later Monday night, but dwelled on the island’s “billions of dollars” of debt to “Wall Street and the banks.”

Anthony is one of many entertainers with Puerto Rican roots trying to summon support.

“Hamilton” star Lin-Manuel tweeted that he’s “texting every famous Puerto Rican singer I know and several I don’t.”

President Donald Trump is finally tweeting about Puerto Rico – but his message may not be well-received by residents struggling with the devastation caused by Hurricane Maria.

Trump says in a trio of tweets Monday night that “Puerto Rico, which was already suffering from broken infrastructure & massive debt, is in deep trouble.”

Trump says the island’s electrical system was “devastated” and much of the island “was destroyed.” He’s also noting Puerto Rico owes “billions of dollars” to “Wall Street and the banks” which, he says, “sadly, must be dealt with.”

He says food, water and medicine are top priorities, and adds the words “doing well.”

His administration is facing steep criticism that its response to Hurricane Maria has fallen short.

It’s already been five days with no lights or air conditioning, and Puerto Rico is looking at many, many more. The power is still out on nearly all the island after Hurricane Maria smashed poles, snarled power lines and flooded electricity-generating plants, knocking out a grid that was already considered antiquated compared to the U.S. mainland.

Power had been restored to a handful of hospitals and surrounding areas by Monday afternoon but Public Affairs Secretary Ramon Rosario said it will take months to fully restore power to the island.

Getting the power back isn’t just a matter of comfort. A long delay will mean even more pain for a Puerto Rican economy that’s already reeling from a decade-long recession.

With no power, even more people will leave the island to find better opportunities on the mainland and further drain its workforce. The downed power system is also damaging the tourism industry, which contributed 8 percent to Puerto Rico’s economy last year.

A Pentagon spokesman, Col. Rob Manning, said the Defense Department is working around the clock to deliver humanitarian assistance to Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

The USS Kearsarge has conducted medical evacuations and airlifted relief supplies to Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

On Sunday , the Kearsarge inserted Marine and Navy teams into Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico, to clear main roads and the airfield to enable additional air support to the overall relief effort.

The military also is helping to restore power on Puerto Rico by providing generators and the fuel to run them.

Meanwhile, the Navy has worked with the Coast Guard to reopen the port of San Juan.

Eight Army UH-60 helicopters from Fort Campbell, Kentucky, are also being flown to San Juan international airport to increase the capacity for distributing relief supplies on the island.

And the Army Corps of Engineers has “conducted a preliminary inspection” of a dam in Puerto Rico that has raised concerns in recent days.

The Trump administration says it is not planning to waive federal restrictions on foreign ships’ transportation of cargo to Puerto Rico and other areas affected by Hurricane Maria, as it did following hurricanes Harvey and Irma.

A spokesman for the Department of Homeland Security says officials believe there is sufficient capacity of U.S.-flagged vessels to move goods to Puerto Rico. Spokesman David Lapan said most of the humanitarian shipments to Puerto Rico will be through barges, which make up a significant portion of the U.S.-flagged cargo fleet.

DHS waived Jones Act restrictions during Harvey and Irma in order to move oil more quickly to the East Coast and make up for the loss of pipelines.

New York Rep Nydia Velazquez has asked for a Jones Act waiver for Maria.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo says President Donald Trump should focus more on hurricane recovery and less on football players.

The Democrat told business leaders Monday that the Republican president’s criticism of NFL players who protest during the national anthem is divisive. He said Trump should pay more attention to helping residents in Florida, Texas, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands still reeling from destructive hurricanes.

Following the storms Cuomo visited Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands in a show of solidarity and to better understand how New York can help. The state is sending personnel and supplies such as drinking water and electric generators.

Cuomo has been mentioned as a possible White House contender in 2020. He’s seeking a third term as governor next year.

A New Jersey family is desperately trying to find a way to get an elderly woman stranded in Puerto Rico to the airport to fly out for treatment for carcinoid tumors in her lungs.

Lisa Suhay says she’s been working with Madeline “Sally” Hennessey’s family to try to get her to the airport in time for a humanitarian flight Monday – or on a scheduled Delta flight Thursday .

“From our end, it’s hoping and praying,” said Hennessey’s daughter, Beth O’Brien, of Wall Township, New Jersey. “We’re trying to contact everybody that we can to get her to the airport.”

Hennessey says her 80-year-old mother needs an injection every 28 days and the next one is scheduled for Oct. 13 . The elderly woman also has an oxygen tank, which needs to remain plugged in. The building where the woman is staying is powered by emergency generators, but the family worries about what will happen if that runs out. They say the woman is having a hard time breathing because of the lack of air conditioning.

The Department of Homeland Security says it’s not planning to waive federal restrictions on foreign ships’ transportation of cargo to Puerto Rico and other areas affected by Hurricane Maria, as it did following hurricanes Harvey and Irma.

A Homeland Security spokesman says that, based on consultation with the Energy Department and other federal agencies, officials believe there is sufficient capacity of U.S.-flagged vessels to move goods to Puerto Rico. Spokesman David Lapan said most of the humanitarian shipments to Puerto Rico will be through barges, which make up a significant portion of the US-flagged cargo fleet.

Lapan said officials waived the Jones Act after hurricanes Harvey and Irma in order to move oil to the East Coast. The waiver also helped make up for the loss of high-capacity pipelines.

The chief of police in Dominica says the confirmed death toll has risen to 27 from Hurricane Maria’s strike on the Caribbean island.

Chief Daniel Carbon told reporters Monday that the toll had risen from 15. He said another 27 were missing.

Maria slammed into the small island on Sept. 18 as a Category 5 hurricane, causing devastating damage, before continuing on to hit Puerto Rico.

The top Democrat in the House is calling upon President Donald Trump to deploy the military to help with the humanitarian crisis in Puerto Rico.

The island territory of more than 3 million U.S. citizens is reeling in the devastating wake of Hurricane Maria. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi says Pentagon resources are needed for search-and-rescue operations, maintaining order, and help with transportation.

The California Democrat also said that the people of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands “deserve to know that their government will be there for them, without question or hesitation.”

The devastation in Puerto Rico has received relatively little media coverage compared to Harvey and Hurricane Irma, and President Donald Trump hasn’t brought much attention to it.

House Speaker Paul Ryan promises that Washington will make sure that the people of hurricane-devastated Puerto Rico will “have what they need.”

The Wisconsin Republican’s statement came as authorities struggle to provide adequate relief to the more than 3 million U.S. citizens on the island territory, which is without power and has seen terrible devastation.

Ryan said Congress is working with the administration to make sure Puerto Rico gets all of the help that’s required. Lawmakers approved $15 billion in hurricane relief in the wake of Harvey but tens of billions of dollars more is sure to be needed in the weeks and months ahead.

The tragedy has received relatively little media coverage compared to Harvey and Hurricane Irma, and President Donald Trump hasn’t brought much attention to it.

House Speaker Paul Ryan promises that Washington will make sure that the people of hurricane-devastated Puerto Rico will “have what they need.”

The Wisconsin Republican’s statement came as authorities struggle to provide adequate relief to the more than 3 million U.S. citizens on the island territory, which is without power and has seen terrible devastation.

Ryan said Congress is working with the administration to make sure Puerto Rico gets all of the help that’s required. Lawmakers approved $15 billion in hurricane relief in the wake of Harvey but tens of billions of dollars more is sure to be needed in the weeks and months ahead.

The tragedy has received relatively little media coverage compared to Harvey and Hurricane Irma, and President Donald Trump hasn’t brought much attention to it.

September 24

The U.S. Department of Energy says initial damage assessments and power restoration efforts have begun on Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

The agency said Sunday that it is coordinating with the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority, FEMA and a team from the New York Power Authority, including the use of drones and helicopters. Restoration efforts to some critical facilities are underway.

An eight-member team from the Energy Department’s Western Area Power Authority that was deployed to Puerto Rico ahead of the storm and assisted with initial damage assessments has been redeployed to St. Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

The Energy Department says additional DOE responders are prepared to deploy to Puerto Rico and will do so as soon as transportation can be arranged.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Sunday launched a state effort to help hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico.

The Democrat announced the relief effort after visiting the island Friday. It will encourage residents statewide to donate goods and will raise funds from the business community for organizations in Puerto Rico.

It also will include efforts from medical professionals to send health care workers from New York to the island and provide support in getting medicine and medical supplies.

Cuomo was joined by entertainer Jennifer Lopez for the announcement.

Lopez, co-chair of the Empire State Relief & Recovery Effort, urged people to support Puerto Rico, the Caribbean and Mexico with donations and contributions.

“I cannot tell you what it meant to me and to the people of Puerto Rico to see New York not only pledge support but Governor Cuomo to actually show up with resources and supplies,” Lopez said.

Cuomo also made a reference to Republican President Donald Trump’s comments criticizing athletes who protest during the national anthem, saying “instead of arguing with football players … why don’t we put the politics aside and focus on helping Americans in desperate need.”

Hurricane Maria slammed into Puerto Rico on Wednesday with heavy winds and rain, knocking out all power to the island. During his visit, Cuomo said he witnessed “breathtaking” devastation. The week before, Cuomo traveled to the U.S. Virgin Islands following Hurricane Irma.

A New York member of Congress who traveled to Puerto Rico with New York’s governor to assess damage by Hurricane Maria says the U.S. territory and the state are inextricably linked.

Democratic Rep. Nydia Velazquez says: “For New Yorkers, Puerto Ricans are family – for some figuratively and, for many of us, literally. New Yorkers take care of their family.”

She notes Puerto Rico was already struggling from a decade-long economic slump, but now “the island has been dealt a crushing blow and needs all the assistance it can get.”

Velazquez has been named by New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo to co-chair a state effort to support Puerto Rico’s recovery.

She says that she and others in the New York congressional delegation will be advocating for federal funding to swiftly repair and rebuild Puerto Rico’s electrical grid, help small businesses recover and address other problems.

Jennifer Lopez has pledged $1 million toward hurricane relief efforts in her family’s native Puerto Rico.

Lopez announced during a news conference with New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Sunday that she would give money from her ongoing Las Vegas residency to various charities in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria. Lopez says she’s also enlisting the help of her boyfriend, former New York Yankees star Alex Rodriguez, and her ex-husband, Marc Anthony.

The 48-year-old Lopez was born in New York to Puerto Rican parents. She says she still has family on the island that she has yet hear from.

Fellow singer Ricky Martin has donated $100,000 to the relief effort and launched an online fundraiser. Puerto Rican rapper Daddy Yankee is sending four truckloads of supplies donated by his fans.

Puerto Rico’s government says engineers will inspect the Guajataca Dam on Sunday to determine the extent of damage inflicted by Hurricane Maria last week.

The dam was cracked but had not burst by late Saturday. But Public Affairs Secretary Ramon Rosario Rosario said in a statement that the dam’s “fissure was big and it will collapse at any minute.”

Fears that the dam would fail prompted the government to evacuate nearby residents.

The 345-yard (316-meter) dam was built around 1928. It holds back a man-made lake covering about 2 square miles (5 square kilometers).

More than 15 inches (nearly 40 centimeters) of rain from Maria fell on the surrounding mountains.

San Juan’s cruiseship and cargo ports are nearly empty after Hurricane María on Sept. 24. (CB photo)


Watch the video: Daddy Yankee Instagram Live from Chicago